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Pippa Middleton talks tennis as new Vanity Fair contributing editor

Already a published author and a magazine columnist, Pippa Middleton has landed her most high-profile gig yet after being named a contributing editor at Vanity Fair. Middleton, the 29-year-old sister of the Duchess of Cambridge, gives her personal look at Wimbledon in her first story for the magazine, remembering her first trip to the sacred ground of the tennis world. The story is accompanied by


Already a published author and a magazine columnist, Pippa Middleton has landed her most high-profile gig yet after being named a contributing editor at Vanity Fair.

Middleton, the 29-year-old sister of the Duchess of Cambridge, gives her personal look at Wimbledon in her first story for the magazine, remembering her first trip to the sacred ground of the tennis world. The story is accompanied by a picture of a sporty Middleton on the court in tennis whites designed by Azzedine Alaia, swinging an old-school wooden racket.

“I first went to Wimbledon when I was eight years old and already a very keen tennis player,” she writes. “During this first trip I acted on my childish tennis dreams and bought myself a postcard of the women’s championship trophy, on which I wrote, ‘I will win this one day,’ with my signature below.”

"We're delighted to have Pippa as a contributor to Vanity Fair," editor Graydon Carter said on the Vanity Fair website. "She's a keen observer of classic British pastimes. She is also an avid sportswoman, and we look forward to her take on traditional English pursuits, beginning with Wimbledon."

Middleton, who has regularly been seen with her sister at Wimbledon's Centre Court in recent years, remembers growing up as a tomboy and even once telling her family that if she had to get married, “it would be in my tennis whites—shorts with no pleats or frills.”

Middleton also conducts a short Q&A with seven-time Wimbledon champ Roger Federer, gives her tips on players to watch (whether for their ability or their looks), and relays some of her own experiences as a Wimbledon fan growing up.

“Queuing from five A.M. on ‘People’s Sunday’ in 2004 with my sister for three hours and getting £35 tickets on Centre Court; my first time ever,” she writes. “Seats were a free-for-all — and I recall almost tripping over myself trying to get as close as possible to my birthday-twin British hero Tim Henman.”

This is Middleton’s second writing gig, as she also pens a monthly column for the England-based Waitrose Magazine. Last year she published her first book, “Celebrate: A Year of British Festivities for Family and Friends.”