Get the latest from TODAY

Sign up for our newsletter
SUBSCRIBE
/ Source: TODAY
By Eun Kyung Kim

As the world waits for the arrival of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's first child, royal watchers have eagerly seized any possible nugget of news about the baby's arrival.

The latest revolves around what some are calling a "glitch" in the official website for the British royal family, a hiccup that may have revealed potential names for the baby.

Some keen royal fans, who obviously have extra time on their hands, noticed that typing certain male names into the royal URL address will redirect the user to the main homepage. For example, adding "/prince-arthur, "/prince-alexander" or "/prince-james" after www.royal.uk will send the user back to the original homepage.

But trying a name that sounds less sovereign, like Rupert or Donald, will send the user to a "page not found" error message on the website.

Buckingham Palace, however, rejected the theory about mistakenly giving away the baby's gender or name.

"A large number of search term redirects were set up some time ago on royal.uk. This was in order to improve user experience," a palace spokesperson told NBC, noting that other names preceded by "prince" or "princess" will produce the same results.

For the record, Harry and Meghan have not publicly revealed whether the baby will be a boy or girl, nor whether they even know themselves. But that hasn’t stopped nearly everyone from playing the guessing game.

After Meghan's friends threw her a lavish baby shower in New York City in February, speculation quickly arose that the duchess was expecting a girl because of all the pink decorations and treats.

The couple have been extremely tight-lipped about details of their impending addition. When the couple announced they were expecting, the official royal due date provided was simply "the spring of 2019." But in January, Meghan slipped details to a well-wisher she met while visiting Birkenhead, England, revealing the baby is expected by the "end of April, early May."

Kensington Palace said earlier this month that Meghan and Harry intend to keep the birth of the baby private, meaning the public likely will not receive news about the arrival until days after. The palace did not indicate exactly how soon the couple will announce the news.

The duke and duchess are expected to have considerably more freedom in their choice of baby names than Harry's brother, Prince William, had with his three children. That's mainly because Harry's child is unlikely to inherit the British throne, falling seventh in line of succession.

Download the TODAY app for all the latest royal baby news.