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'I still pray it's not him'

The mother of Jessie Davis, the Ohio woman who disappeared mysteriously two weeks before she was due to deliver a baby girl, says she thinks she knows what happened to her daughter. But for now, she isn't saying, preferring to keep the focus on the search being conducted with the help of 1,800 volunteers, a remote-controlled airplane and sonar. "I have my feelings about what happened that day," Pa
/ Source: TODAY contributor

The mother of Jessie Davis, the Ohio woman who disappeared mysteriously two weeks before she was due to deliver a baby girl, says she thinks she knows what happened to her daughter.

But for now, she isn't saying, preferring to keep the focus on the search being conducted with the help of 1,800 volunteers, a remote-controlled airplane and sonar.

"I have my feelings about what happened that day," Patty Porter, who last spoke to her daughter June 13, said during an interview Friday on TODAY. "I just want my daughter home."

Porter said that although police are treating the unborn baby's father, Bobby Cutts Jr., like a suspect, she hopes Cutts was telling the truth when he said he had nothing to do with the disappearance of Davis.

"I prayed that it wasn't him. And I still pray it's not him," Porter said. "That does not mean that I do not think he is a suspect as well."

Cutts, 30, a Canton police officer, also fathered Davis' 2-year-old son Blake.

On June 15, Porter found the toddler alone in Davis' home. The house was in disarray, a comforter was missing and there were indications that bleach was spilled on the floor.

Blake doesn't have enough verbal skills yet to tell investigators what happened, but the toddler did provide some clues, and some reason to believe that Davis could have met foul play.

"Mommy was crying. Mommy broke the table. Mommy is in the rug," Blake said, according to media reports.

Search widens

As a large crowd assembled Friday for a second day of searching for the 26-year-old woman, Porter said family members have spent some time just sitting around remembering Davis.

"It's kind of overwhelming when we think about her because, when we think about her, we all sit and laugh," Porter said. "She was just an amazing, funny girl ... She always has a big smile on her face. She was just so full of joy."

Porter resisted questions from TODAY's David Gregory about what she believes happened to her daughter.

"I'm not commenting," she said.

Rick Pitinii, the family's lawyer, said questions about theories and suspects are better directed to law enforcement. The family has only one interest, he said.

"At this point, I think the focus should be on finding Jessie. I don't think the family is that concerned about suspects, associates, persons of interest — whatever you want to label people," Pitinii said. "They want their daughter back. They want their sister back."