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Naval hospital staffers post photos of mishandled newborns, babies called 'mini Satans'

Two medical staffers at a military hospital in Florida are no longer taking care of patients after disturbing images of them mishandling newborn infants surfaced on social media.

In one video, a female staffer is seen sitting up a baby and moving the infant's arms around to music being played in the background. In a photo, a woman holds out her middle finger over a baby's head, with a caption that reads: “How I currently feel about these mini Satans.”

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Hospital staffers disciplined over disturbing pictures of them handling baby

Play Video - 1:36

Hospital staffers disciplined over disturbing pictures of them handling baby

Play Video - 1:36

Both images were taken from a Snapchat account belonging to an employee at Naval Hospital in Jacksonville, Florida.

The employees are not nurses but corpsmen, or enlisted medical staffers, according to a Facebook post by the hospital.

“It's outrageous, unacceptable, incredibly unprofessional, and cannot be tolerated,” the hospital said in its post from its commanding officer.

“We have identified those involved – two junior enlisted corpsmen (not nurses). They have been removed from providing patient care and they will be handled by the legal system and military justice. We've notified the patient's parents.”

TODAY
This image of a hospital employee was taken from a staffer's Snapchat post.

Navy Surgeon Gen. Vice Adm. Forrest Faison said in a statement issued online that he has prohibited employees from using personal cell phones in areas where patients are being treated.

He also directed his commanding officers to “personally contact current mothers and expectant mothers planning to deliver in one of our facilities to reassure them, inform them of our actions, and address any of their concerns.”

“Unprofessional and inappropriate social media behavior is inconsistent with both our core values of honor, courage and commitment as well as our medical ethics, violating the oaths we took for our profession and office,” Faison said.

“In an age where information can be shared instantly, what we say and post online must reflect the highest standards of character and conduct, in both our personal and professional lives.”

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