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Hail Marry: She wants Super Bowl ad to find a hubby

Amy Borkowsky needs to find a good man, and she wants your help. She’s not asking for much, at least not by the standards of the mortgage industry. Just enough money to buy a personal ad — during the Super Bowl.OK, it’s a bit pricey: $3 million. But, Borkowsky points out, where else can she get the attention of 60 million American males, several of whom may be interested in meeting a 5-foot-
/ Source: TODAY contributor

Amy Borkowsky needs to find a good man, and she wants your help. She’s not asking for much, at least not by the standards of the mortgage industry. Just enough money to buy a personal ad — during the Super Bowl.

OK, it’s a bit pricey: $3 million. But, Borkowsky points out, where else can she get the attention of 60 million American males, several of whom may be interested in meeting a 5-foot-6, 110-pound comedian and best-selling author (“Amy's Answering Machine: Messages from Mom,” “Statements: True Tales of Life, Love, and Credit Card Bills”) who is a member of MENSA and once won an artificial fireplace with a suggested retail price of $552 on “The Price Is Right”?

Accepting donations

Borkowsky’s problem is that, even after checking under the couch cushions and returning a lip gloss, she can’t scrape together the $3 million. To bridge the gap, she’s started a Web site, superbowlsinglegirl.com, to advertise her quest and collect donations from a public that she’s sure will have a deep and personal interest in helping her to find a nice man.

“I’m not looking for Mr. Perfect,” she told a TODAY Show reporter Friday. “I’m looking for Mr. Perfect-for-Me.”

On her site, she’s more specific: “My ideal man would have a big brain, a good heart and a really annoying mother.” She adds that he would also have a creative side: “I wouldn’t rule out a creative accountant, unless his creativity resulted in federal charges.”

On Friday, TODAY’s Hoda Kotb and Kathie Lee Gifford had fun talking about Borkowsky’s scheme after reading a story about her in the New York Post. They must have helped publicize her quest, because over the ensuing weekend, her total donations rose from $1,000 to $2,000, leaving her only $2,998,000 short of the amount she needs to buy her 30-second SWF-seeks-male-carbon-based-life-form ad. But Borkowsky is running out of time; NBC, which is broadcasting the Super Bowl, has almost sold out all the ads.

On her Web site, Borkowsky writes that she also may hold a walkathon to raise funds: “Maybe I’ll walk from my apartment to Kleinfeld’s Bridal Shop.” When she visited TODAY on Monday, she revealed that if she falls short of her goal, she intends to contribute all the money raised to United Way.

Kathie Lee’s advice

On Friday, Kotb, whose own search for Mr. Right has been a regular source of material on TODAY, referred to Borkowsky as “This woman who is dying to find a husband.”

“Well on her way,” Gifford said, a bit sarcastically. “She’s probably a math whiz, too. I’m sorry, there’s a little bit of discrepancy between $1,000 [Borkowsky’s total at the time] and a million dollars. Give me her number. I will call her and talk to her. I am older and wiser now and I will talk to her.”

Gifford added that she, too, has a dream that needs only money to bring it to life. “I want to put my show on Broadway next year, but you need $12 million to do it,” she said.

She then offered her own advice on finding a man: “She should go to her local church or her local synagogue or her local bowling alley and meet a nice guy who’s looking for a nice girl,” she said.

“You don’t want someone who you’re going to meet on a Super Bowl ad,” Kotb added.

But Borkowsky will settle for someone she meets anywhere. She describes herself as over the bar scene and online matchmaking services.

The former advertising executive, who grew up on Long Island and lives in Manhattan, is coy about her age, which she says is “somewhere between Carrie and Samantha.” Kotb and Gifford did some mental math and decided that meant mid-40s, a guess that Borkowsky confirmed in a later interview.

Mom would approve

She says that her mother would have approved of her quest, which, she said, “is totally serious.” Borkowsky’s mother, who is deceased, was a classic worrier who constantly called her daughters (Borkowsky has one sister who was married, but is divorced) with motherly advice such as “don’t wear red bathrobes” because she’d heard that red is a gang color.

Her mother’s phone messages were so classic that Borkowsky based a book and two CDs titled “Amy's Answering Machine: Messages from Mom” on them. “My mother would have been really excited that I was finally taking some clear action to try and find a husband,” she said.

Borkowsky launched her Web site on Monday. USA Today wrote a story about her earlier in the week, and the New York Post followed. On Friday, she squeezed in a phone interview for TODAYShow.com between spots on various radio shows. Next week, she’s booked on “The Tyra Banks Show.”

Is she surprised at all the media attention?

“In a way, it doesn’t surprise me,” she said. “Everyone can relate to the search for a life partner, which is one of the most important decisions you can make. This is totally serious. I tried all the usual ways and haven’t met my Mr. Right.”

And the media aren’t the only ones calling. Borkowsky is also hearing from her girlfriends, and even women she’s never met, who are interested in referrals to any men she meets with whom she doesn’t connect.