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/ Source: TODAY
By Scott Stump

The U.S. Secret Service officially concluded its detail of George H.W. Bush on Friday morning after nearly 40 years of protecting the former president code-named "Timberwolf.''

The detail officially ended at 6:01 a.m. Friday in College Station, Texas, on the morning after Bush was buried on the grounds of his presidential library at Texas A&M University.

The Bush Protective Division of the Secret Service tweeted the notice that the detail had come to an end with a heartfelt message for the 41st president, who died on Nov. 30 at 94.

"It was an honor," the organization wrote. "God speed former President George H.W. Bush - you will be missed by all of us."

The U.S. Secret Service concluded its protection detail that included the inaugural ball (above) when George W. Bush was elected president in 1988. Carol T. Powers / The LIFE Picture Collection/Gett
The Secret Service faithfully served the president code-named "Timberwolf" for nearly 40 years. Dirck Halstead / The LIFE Images Collection/Getty

Bush became an especially beloved figure by the organization in 2013, when he shaved his head at 89 in support of the 2-year-old son of a member of his Secret Service detail.

The boy had been diagnosed with leukemia, and Bush joined more than 20 Secret Service men in his unit who shaved their heads in solidarity.

"A lot of the agents shaved their head,” Bush told granddaughter and TODAY contributing correspondent Jenna Bush Hager at the time. "I said, ‘Well why not me?' It was the right thing to do."

The boy's diagnosis hit particularly home for Bush and his wife, Barbara, who lost their daughter, Robin, to leukemia when she was just 3 years old in 1953.

Bushonce told his granddaughter he would be reunited with Robin once he reached the afterlife. He was buried next to Robin and his wife in College Station on Thursday.

The conclusion of the Secret Service detail ended a week of events memorializing Bush that were held in Washington, D.C., and Houston ahead of his burial on Thursday.