Felicity Huffman begins court-ordered community service in Los Angeles

As part of her guilty plea, Huffman agreed to 250 hours of community service.
Felicity Huffman leaves The Teen Project building in Los Angeles on Nov.3, 2019. Huffman spent three hours there, presumably as part of her community service for her part in the college admissions scandal.
Felicity Huffman leaves The Teen Project building in Los Angeles on Nov.3, 2019. Huffman spent three hours there, presumably as part of her community service for her part in the college admissions scandal.Backgrid

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By Ben Kesslen

Fresh out of prison, actress Felicity Huffman began her court-ordered 250 hours of community service over the weekend for her role in the massive college admissions scandal.

Huffman, 56, was seen outside a teen rehab center on Sunday, where she is believed to be working with at-risk and sex-trafficked young women.

Felicity Huffman leaves The Teen Project building in Los Angeles on Nov.3, 2019. Huffman spent three hours there, presumably as part of her community service for her part in the college admissions scandal.Backgrid

In photos captured of Oscar-nominee leaving the center, she is seen wearing jeans and a black sweater, her hair is pulled back, and she is holding what appears to be baking trays.

Huffman was sentenced to 14 days in federal prison after admitting to paying for someone to proctor and correct her daughter's SAT exam, which resulted in the score jumping 400 points above her PSAT performance to 1420 out of a possible 1600.

The “Desperate Housewives” and “American Crime” star served 11 days of her sentence at the Federal Correctional Institution, a low-security prison with approximately 1,200 female inmates, in Dublin, California, before she was released in late October. As part of her guilty plea, Huffman also agreed to pay a $30,000 fine and serve 250 hours of community service.

"Full House" actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion-designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, are also among the 50 people charged in what the FBI dubbed “Operation Varsity Blues,” which uncovered a network of rich and well-connected parents paying for their children to get into elite universities through illegal means.

Loughlin and her husband maintain their innocence and they appear to be headed to a trial.