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Explosive art: Photographer gives life to modern chaos

Dream or nightmare?That's the question some might be left asking after looking at French photographer Cerise Doucède's surrealist art projects "Égarements" ("bewilderment") and "Quotidien" ("everyday"), which show objects suspended in air amidst normal household scenes.The artist says the mesmerizing images are meant to convey the mundane chaos of modern life, and the detached, expressionless
Courtesy Cerise Doucede / Today
'What inspires me [in my pictures] is people,\" said 26-year-old French photographer Cerise Doucede of her art projects \"Égarements\" and \"Quotidien.\"
'What inspires me [in my pictures] is people,\" said 26-year-old French photographer Cerise Doucede of her art projects \"Égarements\" and \"Quotidien.\"Courtesy Cerise Doucede / Today

Dream or nightmare?

That's the question some might be left asking after looking at French photographer Cerise Doucède's surrealist art projects "Égarements" ("bewilderment") and "Quotidien" ("everyday"), which show objects suspended in air amidst normal household scenes.

The artist says the mesmerizing images are meant to convey the mundane chaos of modern life, and the detached, expressionless ways we often respond to our complex environments. "I show a varied range of small daily hallucinations, where the characters are set in surroundings [in which] objects fly, collide and gather, creating brief moments of confusion between reality and fiction," Doucède, 26, told TODAY.com.

She spends roughly three days staging each image, for which she blurs the line between fantasy and reality with numerous items - including bagels, toys cars or even ceramic plates – hanging from thin strings, which are meant to be visible. "Otherwise it's just a fictional or fantastical photo and I didn't want that,” Doucède explained to My Modern Met.

But the most difficult aspect isn't even preparing the scenes – it's dismantling them. "The hardest part is just after the photo, when you have to undo everything," she said. "I spent so much time preparing to get everything that when it was finished, I felt some frustration."

The artist says this image is her favorite.
The artist says this image is her favorite.Courtesy Cerise Doucede / Today

As for her favorite photo from the series? It's the one featuring a blank-faced, elderly woman in a kitchen, surrounded by an explosion of apples. "The other [images] give me the impression of having seen too much, but not this one," she told TODAY.com "I don't know why."

Take a look:

The artist blurs the line between fact and fantasy in these images.
The artist blurs the line between fact and fantasy in these images.Courtesy Cerise Doucede / Today
She hangs the objects from thin strings that she intends to be visible to the viewer: 'Otherwise it's just a fictional or fantastical photo and I didn't want that,' she told MyModernMet.
She hangs the objects from thin strings that she intends to be visible to the viewer: 'Otherwise it's just a fictional or fantastical photo and I didn't want that,' she told MyModernMet.Courtesy Cerise Doucede / Today
She uses props like bagels, toy cars and even ceramic plates to achieve the striking visuals.
She uses props like bagels, toy cars and even ceramic plates to achieve the striking visuals.Courtesy Cerise Doucede / Today
Courtesy Cerise Doucede / Today
Courtesy Cerise Doucede / Today
Courtesy Cerise Doucede / Today
Courtesy Cerise Doucede / Today
Courtesy Cerise Doucede / Today
Courtesy Cerise Doucede / Today

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