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114-year-old recognized as world's oldest woman

As her 115th birthday approaches, Misao Okawa of Japan is feeling good, thanks in part to her new title: she was honored on Wednesday as the world’s oldest woman. Okawa won the title at the age of 114 years and 359 days, according to Guinness World Records. After eating her favorite meal of mackerel sushi, she woke up from a brief nap in her wheelchair, and said the key to a long life is to ��

As her 115th birthday approaches, Misao Okawa of Japan is feeling good, thanks in part to her new title: she was honored on Wednesday as the world’s oldest woman. 

Okawa won the title at the age of 114 years and 359 days, according to Guinness World Records. 

After eating her favorite meal of mackerel sushi, she woke up from a brief nap in her wheelchair, and said the key to a long life is to “watch out for one’s health,” The Associated Press reported.

She told reporters that she is pleased with the honor. 

"I'm happy,” she said, according to Agence France-Presse. “I'm feeling good anyway." 

Okawa was born on March 5, 1898, according to Guinness. She and her husband, Yukio, married in 1919, and had two daughters and a son. 

After her husband died, she moved back to her native Osaka, where she lives in good health with her family nearby. She has four grandchildren and six great grandchildren.

Okawa’s son, Hiroshi, is now 90 but he is not so sure he will reach his mother’s record-setting age.

“On my father's side, there are some who lived long and some who don't — like my father who died at 36 — so I doubt I'll live as long," he told the AP.

Okawa assumed the title from Koto Okubo, also from Japan, who died on Jan. 12 at age 115, Guinness said. Japan is also home to Jiroemon Kimura, who is the world’s oldest man and oldest person, according to Guinness. Today, Kimura is 115 years, 314 days old.

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