1 of 3 Louisville police officers in Breonna Taylor case to be fired, mayor says

Hankison is one of three officers who have been on administrative reassignment while an investigation is conducted into the death of Taylor, 26, an African American emergency-room technician who was killed by police during a raid at her Louisville home.

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/ Source: NBC News
By Janelle Griffith

One of the three Louisville, Kentucky, police officers involved in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor in March is being fired, Mayor Greg Fischer announced Friday morning.

Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Rob Schroeder is initiating termination procedures against Officer Brett Hankison, the mayor said in a statement.

Louisville police officer Brett HankisonLouisville Metro Police Department

"Unfortunately, due to a provision in state law that I very much would like to see changed, both the Chief and I are precluded from talking about what brought us to this moment, or even the timing of this decision," the statement said.

He directed any questions about the state law that precludes city officials from commenting further to Jefferson County Attorney Mike O'Connell.

The FBI announced on May 21 that it was investigating Taylor's death. Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron has said that he was asked to serve as a special prosecutor in the case.

Taylor, 26, an African American emergency-room technician who was killed by police on March 13 after three plainclothes officers used a no-knock warrant to enter her apartment around 12:40 a.m. during a drug investigation. Taylor was shot eight times.

Taylor's family has named Hankison along with officers Jonathan Mattingly and Myles Cosgrove in a wrongful death lawsuit.

Attorneys for Taylor's family say her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fearing a home invasion, called 911, grabbed a gun and fired, shooting an officer in the leg. He had a license to carry and kept firearms in the home. Taylor was unarmed.

The lawsuit accuses the officers of "blindly firing" more than 20 shots into the apartment.

The suspect at the center of the police investigation had already been taken into custody at another residence, the lawsuit states. Taylor and Walker had no criminal history or drug convictions, and no drugs were found in the apartment during the raid, the lawsuit states.

At a news conference on the day of the shooting, police said officers had knocked several times and “announced their presence as police who were there with a search warrant.”

Mattingly and Cosgrove are on administrative reassignment while an investigation is conducted into the death of Taylor. The Louisville Metro Council voted unanimously last Thursday to pass a ban on no-knock warrants, a measure known as “Breonna’s Law.”