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By Keith Wagstaff

The Taylor Swift juggernaut doesn't need Spotify. Views of her YouTube videos doubled in the week after her team pulled her entire catalog off the music-streaming service.

The number of views on her Vevo channel skyrocketed from 12.5 million a day in the week ending on Nov. 3 to 24 million the next week, Nielsen Music Connect told Mashable

Oh, and her album "1989" did pretty well too. It sold 1.287 million copies in its first seven days, the most sold in a single week since Eminem's "The Eminem Show" in 2002. Right now, only three weeks after its release, it's the second best-selling album of 2014, trailing only the "Frozen" soundtrack. 

T-Swift hasn't exactly shown a lot of love for Spotify in the past. In a Wall Street Journal editorial published over the summer, she wrote, "Piracy, file sharing and streaming have shrunk the numbers of paid album sales drastically, and every artist has handled this blow differently."

After she pulled her album, Spotify CEO Daniel Ek vehemently defended his company's business model. "Taylor Swift is absolutely right: music is art, art has real value, and artists deserve to be paid for it," he wrote, claiming Swift stood to make more than $6 million from the service. (The singer's camp then disputed those numbers).

In case you are wondering, Taylor Swift's video for "Shake It Off" has more than 292 million views right now, roughly equal to the entire population of Russia watching the video — twice. Her video for "Blank Space," released on Nov. 10, already has a healthy 67 million views and counting.

While it might seem like Swift loves YouTube, none of her albums can be found on YouTube Music Key, the company's new subscription music service.