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QR code dress is nerd couture

Some people wear their passion on their sleeve, Jessica Stuart had hers printed on a silk-and-linen dress.The bigtime-TV-producer-cum-digital-entrepreneur started a firm that specializes in "short form, multi-use content," and she couldn't have given a better demonstration of what that is than at the recent Webby Awards. Stuart won two awards for a video she created for the Elizabeth Glaser Pedia
In this photo, shown on Mashable.com, Jessica Stuart wears a QR dress. Scan the codes with a smartphone, and you can see her Webby Award-winning video.
In this photo, shown on Mashable.com, Jessica Stuart wears a QR dress. Scan the codes with a smartphone, and you can see her Webby Award-winning video.Today

Some people wear their passion on their sleeve, Jessica Stuart had hers printed on a silk-and-linen dress.

The bigtime-TV-producer-cum-digital-entrepreneur started a firm that specializes in "short form, multi-use content," and she couldn't have given a better demonstration of what that is than at the recent Webby Awards. Stuart won two awards for a video she created for the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, and the dress she wore was printed with QR codes that played the video when the the codes were scanned by more than 100 of those attending the event, by using their smartphones.

In this photo, shown on Mashable.com, Jessica Stuart wears a QR dress. Scan the codes with a smartphone, and you can see her Webby Award-winning video.Today

QR codes are mobile bar codes that are just starting to bubble up in commercial ventures. Home Depot, for example, recently rolled out a national print campaign using them. With QR — which stands for "quick response" — codes, shoppers can use their cellphones to swipe the code to buy items, shop or even watch product videos.

The codes "are popping up not only at hipster events like the annual South by Southwest music and digital conference and festival in Austin, Texas, but also in mainstream corporate marketing," noted Jonathan Blum in a recent Entrepreneur.com article. "TAG Heuer, Macy’s, and the car-maker Mini now sell using QR codes. Some uses seem rather mundane: Retail giant Sears went as far as to place QR codes in a recent mass-market tool catalogue."

But Stuart's dress was anything but mundane. And it was not simple, even though it may have looked that way.

It was "made of a silk and linen blend trimmed with satin, was designed by friends Dave Miss, a graphic designer, and costume designer Sarah Rochford," according to Mashable. "Rochford added horse hair around the trim so that the QR codes would lay flat. The silk screening was produced at Bushwick Print Lab."

"It's my nerd version of the Lady Gaga meat dress," Stuart said.

Below, Stuart's Webby-winning video, "The Time to Eliminate Pediatric HIV is Now."

— Via Mashable

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