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Good Graph Friday: How big city demographics are changing

The Brookings Institution recently took a look at the new U.S. Census data and found some that between 2000 and 2010 a phenomenal 98 percent of population growth in large metropolitan areas came from non-white and Hispanic people.In part as a result of that shift, Brookings found that 22 of the 100 largest metro areas now have “majority minority” populations, meaning that non-whites and Hisp
Brookings Institution / Today

The Brookings Institution recently took a look at the new U.S. Census data and found some that between 2000 and 2010 a phenomenal 98 percent of population growth in large metropolitan areas came from non-white and Hispanic people.

In part as a result of that shift, Brookings found that 22 of the 100 largest metro areas now have “majority minority” populations, meaning that non-whites and Hispanics accounted for more than half the city's population. Those include San Francisco, San Antonio, Honolulu and Miami.

However, the report found that smaller metropolitan areas outside of big metro regions continue to have overwhelmingly white populations.