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Execs are just like you: They don't like their jobs, either

If you feel stuck in a job you don’t like, maybe you can take comfort in the fact that the big boss may well be in the same boat.A new global survey of business executives finds that less than half like their jobs, although most don’t plan on leaving.The Path Forward, a survey of 3,900 business executives from around the world conducted by consulting firm Accenture, found that only 42 percent
The boss may be smiling, but a new survey finds less than half of execs are satisfied with their jobs.Today

If you feel stuck in a job you don’t like, maybe you can take comfort in the fact that the big boss may well be in the same boat.

A new global survey of business executives finds that less than half like their jobs, although most don’t plan on leaving.

The Path Forward, a survey of 3,900 business executives from around the world conducted by consulting firm Accenture, found that only 42 percent said they were satisfied with their jobs. That’s down slightly from 2010.

Despite such widespread unhappiness, only 24 percent the respondents said they were looking for a new job outside their company, while 8 percent said they planned to start their own business. The rest were either staying put or planning to look for another position in the same company.

The big bosses have the same gripes many people lower on the career ladder do. The most common complaint was that they felt underpaid. Many also said the hours are too long, the workload is too heavy and they see no opportunity for growth or advancement.

The Accenture survey also found that more than four in 10 said the current economic malaise appears to have slowed their careers. That’s about the same percentage of respondents who said parenthood was having an impact on their career slowing down.

The people in the corner offices appear to be juggling the professional and the personal just like the people who they manage. About seven in 10 said they have work/life balance most or all of the time, but four in 10 admitted career demands have a negative impact on family life.

The survey took place in December.

On the lower rungs of the career ladder, many workers have reported in the past few years that they feel overworked, underpaid – and relieved just to have a job.

That’s not necessarily surprising, given the way things have gone the last few years. The unemployment rate in the United States has been improving, but still remains unusually high. With companies hesitant to hire, many workers have been asked to put in more hours or take on more responsibilities.

That’s left many workers feeling disgruntled.

A survey in August found that a whopping eight in 10 employees who left their job this year would not recommend their former employer, a significant increase from just a few years earlier.