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Buzz: Orange shirts, pink slips and taxes, taxes, taxes

Wear an orange shirt, get a pink slip?Many Life Inc. readers were outraged by a post this week about 14 employees at a Florida law firm who said they were terminated because they were wearing orange shirts.Some employees told the Sun-Sentinel that management saw the shirts as a sign of protest, but that they really wore the shirts because they wanted to match at a happy hour gathering. The law fir

Wear an orange shirt, get a pink slip?

Many Life Inc. readers were outraged by a post this week about 14 employees at a Florida law firm who said they were terminated because they were wearing orange shirts.

Some employees told the Sun-Sentinel that management saw the shirts as a sign of protest, but that they really wore the shirts because they wanted to match at a happy hour gathering. The law firm declined comment.

“This whole thing is ridiculous.  Another thought - how many men showed up wearing white button down shirts and a blue tie? Hm? Fire them! It's a conspiracy!” one reader wrote.

Still, some argued that, like it or not, employers can control who they pay.

“Although I think getting rid of all of them was wrong, employers have rights too. They have the right to like or dislike what their employees say, think, and what they do on the job … and yes... they don't have to like everyone wearing orange,” one reader wrote.

It’s tax season, which for some people means refunds -- and for others means the nightmare of dealing with identity theft tax fraud.

The IRS commissioner said this week that the average refund being handed out so far this tax season is about $3,000. About one-quarter of our readers said they expected to receive that much, or more, back from the government.

But most were expecting to see less, if they were getting a refund at all.

Still, many readers said they’d rather give then receive, when it comes to the IRS anyway.

“I would much rather pay than let the IRS keep my money interest free for a year,” one reader wrote.

Doing your taxes is always a pain, but it can be a nightmare for people who were victims of identity theft tax fraud. That's when someone files a bogus return using your information and collects a fake refund.

A story this week on the months of frustrations some people have gone through to get their identity theft problems resolved prompted a lot of outrage, and a lot of sympathy.

“The more I read, the worst I felt for the victims. It's like a nightmare that goes on and on!” one reader wrote.