EPA approves first 2 surface disinfectants to protect against COVID-19

The two products, both disinfectant sprays, are made by Lysol.
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/ Source: TODAY
By Kerry Breen

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved the use of two types of Lysol disinfectant sprays to protect against the novel coronavirus, making them the first products of their kind to reach this milestone.

According to a press release from Lysol's manufacturer, RB, Lysol Disinfectant Spray and Lysol Disinfectant Max Cover Mist are the first surface disinfectant products that the EPA has approved as effective against the novel coronavirus.

Lysol Disinfectant Spray can kill the virus "at 2 minutes of use," per the release. This product was also analyzed in a peer-reviewed study commissioned by RB, which found it was more than 99.9% effective against the virus.

The research, published in May in the American Journal of Infection Control, was the first "comprehensive evaluation of the effectiveness of well-known brands like Lysol" in the fight against COVID-19, according to the press release.

"Hygiene is both the foundation of health and essential in preventing the spread of illness causing germs," said Rahul Kadyan, an executive vice president at RB, in a statement. "The EPA's approval recognizes that using Lysol Disinfectant Spray can help to prevent the spread of COVID-19 on hard, non-porous surfaces."

According to the press release, Lysol is currently testing other products to measure their efficacy against the coronavirus.

The EPA has a list of more than 420 disinfectants that meet the agency's criteria for use against the novel coronavirus. The two Lysol products are the first on the list for which the EPA has reviewed laboratory testing data and approved label claims against the novel coronavirus.

Other products on the EPA's disinfectant list include the Scrubbing Bubbles Multi-Purpose Disinfectant, Clorox Bleach Blanqueador and Arm and Hammer Essentials Disinfecting Wipes. To be on the EPA's disinfectant list, a product must either demonstrate efficacy against a virus harder to kill than the novel coronavirus or a similar type of human coronavirus.

Disinfectants should only be used on surfaces, like countertops or doorknobs, and should never be consumed.