Savannah needs more eye surgery after suffering complication from first operation

Savannah told Ellen DeGeneres she is still seeing "big, blurry spots," but her cataract surgery is on hold due to the coronavirus pandemic.
/ Source: TODAY

Savannah Guthrie isn't out of the woods yet with her eyesight troubles.

She joined her TODAY co-anchor Hoda Kotb on "The Ellen DeGeneres Show," aired Thursday, and revealed that she needs to have cataract surgery. But she can't get it done right now because of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Savannah underwent retinal detachment surgery in December after her son, Charley, now 3, accidentally jabbed her in the right eye with a toy train.

"It's getting better. The surgery worked," Savannah told DeGeneres. "A lot of people get complications, and I did, too, so I have to have cataract surgery, but I can't have it until all this has passed."

Savannah added, "It's kind of funny, kind of not. I see, but I see big, blurry spots."

DeGeneres joked that Savannah's condition is an unexpected consequence of parenting.

"That's a thing you don't even think about — you think about changing diapers and no sleep, but you don't think about the train in the eye, and now you do," the comedian said.

Savannah spoke about the expected follow-up surgeries with People magazine in April, explaining that she thinks her eyesight is getting worse.

"Eventually I’m hopeful that when everything turns to normal, I’ll be able to schedule those surgeries, and I’m hopeful there’ll be a big improvement,” she said. “I don’t think my eye will ever be the way it once was, but I think it will be much improved."

She expanded on why she has to have cataract surgery.

“When you have this retinal detachment, most people will end up developing cataracts obviously at a much younger age than would normally be expected,” she said. “When you have cataracts, you get blurry spots, and you notice it more and more.”

Savannah also spoke with DeGeneres about working remotely for TODAY from the basement of a house in upstate New York, where she's staying with her husband and two children during the pandemic. Savannah and husband Michael Feldman are also parents to daughter Vale, who will turn 6 in August.

"If you listen carefully, a lot of times you can hear the pitter patter of little feet, but it's more like 25 hyenas roaring through or scooters rolling back and forth,'' Savannah quipped. "I feel really grateful actually to still do the job."