Savannah Guthrie set to undergo another eye surgery to fix cataract

The TODAY co-anchor is undergoing cataract surgery in the latest step in her journey to repair her vision after tearing her retina last year.
/ Source: TODAY

Savannah Guthrie is ready for the next step in the journey to repair her vision.

The TODAY co-anchor left the show a little early on Monday to undergo cataract surgery on her right eye to help repair a blurry spot that has persisted since she had retinal detachment surgery in December. Savannah injured her eye when her son, Charley, now 3, accidentally jabbed her with a toy train.

Watch TODAY All Day! Get the best news, information and inspiration from TODAY, all day long.

Savannah has had to put off the surgery due to the coronavirus pandemic, but now she is looking forward to improved vision in her right eye.

"It's been a long time, I'm super excited," Savannah said on TODAY. "I feel like it's Christmas morning because if they remove this cataract I'll really be able to see, and I've had a hard time seeing."

If everything goes as planned during the half-hour surgery, Savannah should be on her way to improved vision.

"It's kind of distorted and then it's got a wavy thing, and now I have this cataract, which is a big blurry spot," she said. "Once they remove that blur, I think it will be a lot better."

She will not be on the show Tuesday as she recovers, but hopes to be back in a few days.

"Hopefully next time I see you I'll really see you!" she said.

The surgery, which is common following the retinal procedure she had, was in the works for a while but had to be pushed back during the pandemic. Savannah spoke about the expected follow-up surgeries with Ellen DeGeneres last month.

"It's getting better. The surgery worked," she said. "A lot of people get complications, and I did, too, so I have to have cataract surgery, but I can't have it until all this has passed."

"It's kind of funny, kind of not," Savannah added. "I see, but I see big, blurry spots."

She also spoke with People magazine in April, explaining that she may never fully recover the vision in her right eye.

“I don’t think my eye will ever be the way it once was, but I think it will be much improved," she said.