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Faith Hill and Tim McGraw's daughter Gracie calls out fan slamming her for taking Ozempic

McGraw has been open about her experience with the diabetes drug that has been used off-label by people to lose weight.
/ Source: TODAY

Tim McGraw and Faith Hill’s daughter Gracie McGraw has fired back at a person who criticized her for taking Ozempic, the controversial Type 2 diabetes medication that's been making headlines for its side effect of weight loss.

“It’s a gorgeous day for narcissism!” McGraw captioned a pair of photos on Instagram on May 26.

“And Ozempic!” someone wrote in the comments.

McGraw responded that she did take Ozempic, but is now on a different medication to help her polycystic ovary syndrome.

“I did use ozempic last year, yes,” McGraw responded. “I am now on a low dose of mounjaro for my PCOS as well as working out. No need to accuse when I have been open about it.”

Mounjaro is another medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat Type 2 diabetes (along with diet and exercise), and it can also induce weight loss. Its manufacturer, Eli Lilly, previously told TODAY.com in a statement that it "does not promote or encourage the off-label use of any of our medicines."

In March 2022, McGraw revealed on Instagram that she had been diagnosed with PCOS and prescribed Ozempic, noting the transformation in her own body.

“The medicine I’m taking has given me a body I haven’t had in years (maybe ever?) in a good way though,” she wrote. “It’s weird to see how your body can change so rapidly but I’m finding new ways to love her and new things to love about her everyday."

TODAY.com previously spoke with another woman with PCOS who was prescribed Ozempic to manage her weight. The condition can lead to a hormonal imbalance and metabolism problems, which can cause weight gain or difficulty losing weight, according to the Office on Women’s Health.

“Within a month, I dropped 20 pounds and it was marvelous. I couldn’t believe it. I hadn’t lost that much weight since I was in my mid-30s. I just said, this is a way forward. This is going to get me to the finish line,” Wynter Mitchell, 43, who took the medication to increase her chances of successful in vitro fertilization, told TODAY.com in April.

However, maternal-fetal medicine specialists also noted to TODAY.com that more research on how these medications affect women of childbearing age is needed.

Novo Nordisk, the manufacturer of Ozempic, previously told TODAY.com in a statement that it does not condone using the medication for anything other than its FDA-approved purpose.

“While we recognize that some healthcare providers may be prescribing Ozempic for patients whose goal is to lose weight, we do not promote, suggest, or encourage off-label use of our medicines,” the company said in a statement to TODAY.com. “We trust that healthcare providers are evaluating a patient’s individual needs and determining which medicine is right for that particular patient.”