Health & Wellness

Gwyneth Paltrow's website slammed over 'deceptive' health claims

A crystal that "treats infertility," a $22 bar of soap for psoriasis and wearable stickers that "promote healing" are among the products endorsed or sold via Gwyneth Paltrow's fashion, beauty and wellness brand Goop — and that's a problem, according to one watchdog group.

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Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop under fire for alleged deceptive claims

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Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop under fire for alleged deceptive claims

Play Video - 3:10

In a complaint filed with two California district attorneys, the group called Truth In Advertising (TINA) has urged regulators to take action over the company's alleged use of "unsubstantiated, and therefore deceptive, health and disease-treatment claims to market many of its products."

Paltrow originally founded the brand in 2008 as a weekly email newsletter, but now she serves as CEO to the growing retail and lifestyle business.

Our first ever wellness summit, June 10, Los Angeles! Link 👆🏼#ingoophealth

A post shared by Gwyneth Paltrow (@gwynethpaltrow) on

"We test the waters so that you don’t have to," reads a message on the "What's Goop?" section of the company's website. "We will never recommend something that we don’t love and think worthy of your wallets and your time. We value your trust above all things."

But according to TINA's executive director, Bonnie Patten, that trust from consumers may be misplaced.

"Women that are having infertility problems are desperate to find a cure or treatment, and Goop is taking advantage of people at their most vulnerable positions," she told NBC's Joe Fryer for TODAY. "And it's really just not acceptable."

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Gwyneth Paltrow on Goop brand, her acting career, daughter Apple

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Gwyneth Paltrow on Goop brand, her acting career, daughter Apple

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The group, which first reached out to Goop directly in August, has cataloged 50 instances in which it states the company has claimed products "can treat, cure, prevent, alleviate the symptoms of, or reduce the risk of developing a number of ailments ..."

"Goop does not have the right to market its products using disease treatment claims," Patten said. "That is flat out against the law."

California state regulators are reviewing the complaint.

NBC News reached out to Goop for comment and received the following statement:

"Goop is dedicated to introducing unique products and offerings and encouraging constructive conversation surrounding new ideas. We are receptive to feedback and consistently seek to improve the quality of the products and information referenced on our site. We responded promptly and in good faith to the initial outreach from representatives of TINA and hoped to engage with them to address their concerns. Unfortunately, they provided limited information and made threats under arbitrary deadlines which were not reasonable under the circumstances."

Calling the allegations from TINA "unsubstantiated and unfounded," the statement added, "We will continue to evaluate our products and our content and make those improvements that we believe are reasonable and necessary in the interests of our community of users.”

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