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Due to increased demand, CVS and Rite Aid limit purchase of morning-after pills

Plan B and Aftera, known as “morning-after” pills, are both brand names for the drug Levonorgestrel, an emergency contraceptive.
Plan B One-Step
Plan B One-Step, an emergency contraceptive commonly referred to as the "morning after pill."Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman/Tribune News Service via Getty Images file
/ Source: NBC News

CVS and Rite Aid are limiting the amount of Plan B that a customer can buy to “ensure equitable access” and because of increased demand, respectively, the companies said in statements.

“We have ample supply of Plan B and Aftera across all of our CVS Pharmacy stores and CVS.com. To ensure equitable access and consistent supply on store shelves, we’ve implemented a temporary purchase limit of three on these products,” a statement from Ethan Slavin with CVS Health said.

Meanwhile, Terri Hickey, the director of public relations for Rite Aid said: “Due to increased demand, at this time we are limiting purchases of Plan B contraceptive pills to three per customer.” 

Plan B and Aftera, known as “the morning-after” pills are both brand names for the drug Levonorgestrel, an emergency contraceptive.

Neither should be used as a regular birth control, according to the companies that make them. Women should continue taking their birth control even if they’ve used Levonorgestrel.

The medication should be taken 72 hours after unprotected sex, but the sooner it is taken, the more effective it is.

This story originally appeared on NBCNews.com.