Health & Wellness

At 80, Morgan Freeman has one little tip for keeping his energy up

This June, Oscar winner Morgan Freeman rang in his 80th birthday.

But at an age when most folks are thinking of playing golf and sleeping late, Freeman shows no signs of slowing down.

He's the producer of the CBS hit "Madam Secretary," now in its fourth season. And he's the host of National Geographic's "The Story of Us," which premieres Oct. 11. And even though he's admittedly not a morning person ("Nope!" he says crisply), Freeman shares his secret to his unflagging energy.

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Morgan Freeman tells Megyn Kelly about 'Story of Us,' 'Madam Secretary'

Play Video - 6:47

Morgan Freeman tells Megyn Kelly about 'Story of Us,' 'Madam Secretary'

Play Video - 6:47

"I have work to do. Keeping busy is one thing. It had a lot to do with eating, where your energy levels are," he says. "I eat as seldom as I can. If they made a pill, I'd just take the pill. I wouldn't bother with the other stuff. I take a handful of vitamins and supplements in the morning and wash it down with an antioxidant drink."

Clearly, it must be working: "I'm still here."

Indeed, to say the least. "The Story of Us" explores cultures and what binds people together.

"We did a documentary on belief systems. It was very well-received. So we were asked, 'What else can you do for us?' We were talking about doing a story of man," Freeman says.

"The story of man sounds like we're going to talk about evolution. We narrowed that down to present-day situations in the world, how people are coping. That was the genesis," he says.

The topic is fitting. Given his rich, resonant voice, Freeman has already played God in "Bruce Almighty." Yes, when he's in line somewhere , or out in public, it doesn't go unnoticed: "They recognize me or the voice."

But Freeman hasn't let fame, or his Oscar go to his head. Take his role on "Madam Secretary."

"I played the Supreme Court justice in season two, which I directed. I auditioned," says Freeman. "You should make everybody to audition unless you don't want them to audition."

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