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10 principles to get you through training

No time to run? Too tired? Every marathon runner realizes a training schedule is work. Read an excerpt from Runner's World magazine.

The following principles should help guide you through the inevitable highs and lows of your marathon training program. Keep this in mind: A marathon training program can survive many changes as long as your determination remains strong. If you need to adjust the training schedule because of travel, time conflicts at home or work, or weather problems, remember to follow an easy day/hard day pattern. (Run easy today, hard tomorrow, easy the next day, hard the day after, etc.) Don't run hard two days consecutively to compensate for lost training. And be sure to view LSD, as well as any speedwork, as a hard day — and thus never do speedwork and a long run on successive days. Regular runs on hilly terrain are an important component in building strength and stamina. If hills are available where you live, make sure to include them in your running routes — especially if your marathon has hills.1. Alternate hard days with easy daysIf you need to adjust the training schedule because of travel, time conflicts at home or work, or weather problems, remember to follow an easy day/hard day pattern. (Run easy today, hard tomorrow, easy the next day, hard the day after, etc.) Don't run hard two days consecutively to compensate for lost training. And be sure to view LSD, as well as any speedwork, as a hard day — and thus never do speedwork and a long run on successive days.2. Ain't no mountain high enough
Regular runs on hilly terrain are an important component in building strength and stamina. If hills are available where you live, make sure to include them in your running routes — especially if your marathon has hills.

3. Don't skimp on the sleep
Don't skimp on sleep during your marathon build-up. Consistent quality sleep (seven hours minimum a night for most people) is vital to recovery from the wear-and-tear of workouts.

4. If you're hurting, take it easy
Don't run with an injury. If you sense the onset of one, rest or cross train for 1 to 3 days to see if the injury symptoms subside. If they do, resume gentle running. If they don't, seek professional medical opinion as to the nature of your injury and continue to lay off of running until cleared to resume by the professional.

5. Step lively
Never train in broken-down shoes. Quality running shoes last for a maximum of 500 miles or less before their support systems break down. Carefully gauge the condition of your shoes against the number of miles you've run in them. When you begin to feel regular flare ups of knee, shin, foot, or hip discomfort, it's probably time for new shoes. Continuing to run in broken-down shoes often results in injuries.

Excerpted from "10 Principles of Marathon Training" in Runner's World.To read the full article,