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Turkey 101

Thanksgiving day is just a week away and if preparing a turkey for dinner has you all gobbled up, then fear no more. On NBC’s “Today” show, Susan Westmoreland, editor of “The All New Good Housekeeping” cookbook offers some tips to help you tackle the basics.TURKEY 1Pfalsefalserightmsnbc/1262000/1262846.jpg116318600righthttp://media2.s-nbcnews.comChoose your turkey by size — there is no
Today
/ Source: msnbc.com

Thanksgiving day is just a week away and if preparing a turkey for dinner has you all gobbled up, then fear no more. On NBC’s “Today” show, Susan Westmoreland, editor of “The All New Good Housekeeping” cookbook offers some tips to help you tackle the basics.

TURKEY

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Choose your turkey by size — there is no difference in flavor or texture between a tom (male) and a hen (female). Fresh birds are especially delicious, but if you choose to buy a frozen bird, be sure to allow enough time for thorough thawing. Farm-raised wild turkeys, found in specialty butcher shops, have a mildly gamy flavor and are never as big or as meaty as the supermarket variety.

Turkey Parts

Turkey parts are readily available and can be prepared in as many ways as chicken. Whole turkey breast is a good way to feed a crowd and makes tasty leftovers for sandwiches. Turkey drumsticks, both economical and tasty, are an excellent choice for a weeknight meal. Lean turkey cutlets (boneless sliced turkey breast) cook quickly and look elegant, but take care not to overcook them, or they will toughen and dry out.

Excerpted from “The All New Good Housekeeping Cookbook.” Copyright © 2001 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.