Savannah made a beautiful rainbow cheesecake with her kids

This no-bake cheesecake is colorful and fun. The hardest part is just waiting for it to set!
savannahguthrie/Instagram

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/ Source: TODAY
By Erica Chayes Wida

In need of another fun activity to keep the kids busy at home?

TODAY anchor Savannah Guthrie whipped up a beautiful rainbow cheesecake over the weekend with her little ones — and it was surprisingly simple to make.

With many people around the world restricted from leaving their homes (except for essential activities), many have taken to cooking and baking. Some have seized the opportunity to teach their kids fun lessons in the kitchen, while others have used the extra time to enjoy a little extra comfort food. The TODAY family is doing both!

Two TODAY chefs started an Instagram hub for virtual cooking, Al Roker has been cooking up a storm while Nick, his son, films the action and Savannah couldn't resist getting in on the tasty action.

On Sunday, Savannah tried her hand at making a gorgeous, kid-friendly cheesecake from Cayla Gallagher's cookbook, "Unicorn Food." With the help of her daughter, Vale, 5, and son, Charley, 3, she succeeded at making a multi-layered, magical and, best of all, no-bake, dessert.

"It tested the limits of my baking ability, but most people would find this recipe to be easy as pie," Savannah told TODAY Food.

The recipe, which is gelatin-free for those who don't consume pork (or those who don't have gelatin in the pantry), is surprisingly simple. It uses only a handful of ingredients and has plenty of steps, like crushing cookies and mixing cream cheese, that are ideal for getting young children involved.

No-Bake Rainbow Cheesecake

"It was good for little ones because they each smashed up animal crackers for the crust," Savannah added. "And they each had three bowls of colors to stir."

Anyone with kids knows how much they love squeezing droplets of food coloring into bowls of batter or frosting and watching the vibrant colors swirl together. While Vale and Charley enjoyed this part, Savannah thought the cake would have been a bit simpler with fewer rainbow layers.

"I think it would be easier with four colors," she said. "Spreading is tricky — for adults, not little ones."

While the active prep time (a mere 20 minutes) for the rainbow cheesecake is brief enough to keep young kids focused, parents might want to have some other activities planned during the process.

"It takes a while, though, because each layer has to go in the freezer for 10 minutes," Savannah said. Six layers equals at least an hour of freezing time.

For many parents, a two-hour activity is a welcome way to entertain the family. And if it's one that results in a divine dessert everyone can eat together, all the better.