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Fresh! Steal this chef's tuna tartare recipe

In this special weekly feature, “Today” food editor Phil Lempert brings you recipes “stolen” (with permission) from notable restaurants across the world. See how much money you can save — and fun you can have — by cooking these dishes at home!This week: Yellow Fin Tuna Tartare, from Aleo in New York CityAleo is one of those restaurants with history — family history! Native New Yorker

In this special weekly feature, “Today” food editor Phil Lempert brings you recipes “stolen” (with permission) from notable restaurants across the world. See how much money you can save — and fun you can have — by cooking these dishes at home!

This week: Yellow Fin Tuna Tartare, from Aleo in New York City

Aleo is one of those restaurants with history family history! Native New Yorker and ex-Wall Streeter Peter Raimondi created the name of his eatery after his parents, Antoinette and Leonardo. Look around the room, situated in New York’s trendy Flatiron district, and you’ll see Raimondi family photos intermingled with works of art.

The restaurant is focused on Mediterranean cuisine, with an emphasis on savory Italian flavors. Executive chef Pnina Peled’s expertly prepared seafood, original pasta creations and prime-cut meats can also be enjoyed in the pretty outdoor garden, where the crooning of Sinatra and Luis Miguel competes with the soothing sounds of small waterfalls.

More about the chef: Peled, who is also the restaurant’s operating partner, combines skills learned at home her family is from Tripoli, the Italian-influenced capital of Libya with those she learned at the Peter Kump cooking school in New York and previous stints at Nisos, Becco and Eleven Madison Park.

(Please note that ingredient prices are estimates and based on national averages. Amounts listed are for one portion. Increase proportionately according to number of portions desired.)

Yellow Fin Tuna TartarePnina Peled

Combine all ingredients in a bowl. The Kalamata olive is a dark Greek olive. Regular black olives can be used as a substitute. Season to taste with salt and fresh-ground pepper. Set into cooler until mixture cools thoroughly. Press tuna mixture into a 4-inch round mold or biscuit cutter. Garnish with crisp salad leaves and several potato chips.

$23 for dinner at Aleo, $3.42 to make at home.

912296139804sushi-grade tuna 0.5cup1/2 cup sushi-grade tuna ($2.39)minced kalamata olives 1teaspoon1 tsp. minced kalamata olives ($0.17)minced red onions 0.5teaspoon1/2 tsp. minced red onions ($0.03)diced avocado 1teaspoon1 tsp. diced avocado ($0.19)fresh chopped dill 0.25teaspoon1/4 tsp. fresh chopped dill ($0.24)citrus vinaigrette 1tablespoon1 Tbsp. citrus vinaigrette (see recipe below)

Citrus VinaigrettePnina Peled

In a small mixing bowl, combine all ingredients except the olive oil. Using a whisk or food processor, slowly add the olive oil in a small stream until the mixture begins to thicken. Reserve in the cooler until tartare is ready to assemble.

9122961smooth dijon mustard 0.125teaspoon1/8 teaspoon smooth Dijon mustard ($0.11)extra-virgin olive oil 1tablespoon1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil ($0.09)cup fresh-squeezed orange juice 1tablespoon1 Tbsp. cup fresh-squeezed orange juice ($0.13)tabasco sauce 2dash2 dashes of Tabasco sauce ($0.04)salt 1pinch1 pinch of salt ($0.01)white pepper 1pinch1 pinch of white pepper ($0.02)

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Aleo Restaurant

7 West 20th Street

New York, NY

212-691-8136

www.aleorestaurant.com

Want to find out how you can make your favorite restaurant recipe at home? Just send e-mail Phil at Phil.Lempert@nbc.com (or using the mail box below) with the name of the restaurant, city and state and the dish you would like to have re-created! Want to know more about Phil and food? Visit his website at www.supermarketguru.com.