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Dining dollars: Family meals on a budget

We've all heard the expression “buying in bulk” — but have you thought about turning that purchase into several meals? Buying inexpensive products and creating lots of meals can lower the cost of feeding a family. Annie Copps of Yankee magazine shares three cost-effective foods that go the distance, and recipes.Onions ($1.50 to $2/pound) If stored properly, they last months. They also add fl
/ Source: TODAY recipes

We've all heard the expression “buying in bulk” — but have you thought about turning that purchase into several meals? Buying inexpensive products and creating lots of meals can lower the cost of feeding a family. Annie Copps of Yankee magazine shares three cost-effective foods that go the distance, and recipes.



Onions ($1.50 to $2/pound)

If stored properly, they last months. They also add flavor to any savory dish. Onions have a variety of medicinal effects. Early American settlers used wild onions to treat colds, coughs, and asthma, and to repel insects; makes sense! Chinese medicine uses onions to treat angina, coughs, bacterial infections, and breathing problems. There is a lot of research pointing toward the sulfides in onions (and garlic) as an aid to lowering blood lipids and blood pressure.



Cabbage($1.20 to $2 per head)

Cabbage is sort of the dowdy cousin that people eat but never think about. Not only is it a terrific source of vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin B6 and vitamin A but it also protects against osteoporosis, prevents cell damage and helps with blood clotting. Women should also know that it is an antioxidant, helps with eye function, promotes formation of strong bones, guards us against bacterial, viral and parasitic infections, heart disease, stroke and lowers blood cholesterol level. A well-known wrinkle eliminator, it also reduces fine lines in the skin and helps fade age spots. Cabbage is also packed with dietary fiber, manganese, folate, thiamin, riboflavin, calcium, potassium, and magnesium.

Pork shoulder(about $1.50 to $1.99 a pound and usually between 7 to 9 pounds)

Pork has gotten so much better after years of being breeding out the flavor — producers are no longer making tasteless meat, but pork the way we liked it. A pork shoulder or Boston butt has tons of flavor, but is a big piece of meat and a bit tough. Braising is a great way to coax out flavor and tenderness, and a very forgiving cooking technique. Pork shoulder runs about $1.50 to 1.99 a pound and usually between 7 to 9 pounds.

Baked stuffed onions

Annie Copps, Yankee magazine

Onion biscuts

Annie Copps, Yankee magazine

Gratin of cabbage

Annie Copps, Yankee magazine