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A new hope in the war against dog cancer

From TODAY correspondent Jill RappaportThe sickening truth is that cancer can affect anyone, and our beloved pets are sadly no exception. But this summer Palladia arrived, making it the first approved cancer drug for dogs, aimed at those afflicted with mast cell cancer. This is incredible news, and it could be a blessing for so many animals all over the world. With this FDA-approved drug that kil

From TODAY correspondent Jill Rappaport

The sickening truth is that cancer can affect anyone, and our beloved pets are sadly no exception. But this summer Palladia arrived, making it the first approved cancer drug for dogs, aimed at those afflicted with mast cell cancer. This is incredible news, and it could be a blessing for so many animals all over the world. 

With this FDA-approved drug that kills tumor cells and cuts off blood supply to the tumors, dogs may have a better chance of surviving the disease. "It's very non-invasive," said Ann Hohenhaus, staff oncologist at the Animal Medical Center in New York City. "The oral nature of the drug makes it very appealing to drug owners."

When I went to the Animal Medical Center, I met with dogs afflicted with this disease and their owners. Knowing this drug is now available is helping so many owners breathe a sigh of relief, and so far it looks like the results have proven to be quite positive in several dogs. But only time will tell if this very important drug can really extend the lives of our "fur angels."

As a major animal lover and owner of four dogs, I am just so elated that so many advances are  being made in veterinary medicine that can hopefully give our pets more precious years -- which they so deserve, and we as their owners desperately need.

Click here for more on the Animal Medical Center in New York City.