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Live from Studio 1A: Lust in Translation

This morning we had Pamela Druckerman, author of "Lust in Translation" on the show.  The book examines the way different countries perceive adultery.  The United States is apparently one of the few countries, in which the confession approach when it comes to adultery is particularly prevalent. Many countries, particularly in Europe, view adultery as something that can be and should be enjoyed wi

This morning we had Pamela Druckerman, author of "Lust in Translation" on the show.  The book examines the way different countries perceive adultery.  The United States is apparently one of the few countries, in which the confession approach when it comes to adultery is particularly prevalent. Many countries, particularly in Europe, view adultery as something that can be and should be enjoyed with having to confess and clear one's conscience. 

Druckerman also mentioned the way in which pop culture depicts adulterous affairs, also demonstrates the discrepancies between the U.S. and other countries. If you think about it, many of the television shows and movies we watch here in the U.S. depict the scenario over and over again, where a spouse cheats and never gets away with it, because they are inevitably caught or so racked with guilt that the discretion must be confessed.  In France apparently, that situation is rarely the case. A hero in a French movie could have an affair, but still be depicted as the hero, not suffering the consequences of an indiscretion.

What does this mean for the big picture? Should you confess, clear your conscience, and possibly cause pain in doing so? Or is the better route to simply keep your secrets?