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Live From Studio 1A: Embryo Battle

This morning, we ran a story on Augusta and Randy Roman, a divorced couple that -- when they were married -- had planned to conceive a child through in-vitro fertilization. But divorce complicated their plans and brought about a legal and ethical issue -- what should be done with frozen embryos after a couple gets divorced?Augusta, her lawyer, and Randy's lawyer also joined Meredith for a live in

This morning, we ran a story on Augusta and Randy Roman, a divorced couple that -- when they were married -- had planned to conceive a child through in-vitro fertilization. 

But divorce complicated their plans and brought about a legal and ethical issue -- what should be done with frozen embryos after a couple gets divorced?

Augusta, her lawyer, and Randy's lawyer also joined Meredith for a live interview this morning. WATCH VIDEO

Doctors had retrieved 13 eggs from Augusta's ovaries, and six had been fertilized with Randy's sperm. But just hours before the embryos were to be implanted into Augusta's womb, Randy got cold feet. He canceled the procedure, and the embryos were frozen while the couple underwent counseling.

Counseling didn't work, and their 6-year marriage soon dissolved.

Augusta has argued that she should be allowed to implant the embryos and attempt to have a child. And she has agreed to absolve Randy of any financial or parental obligations.

Since the couple is no longer together, Randy wants the embryos destroyed -- or at least frozen indefinitely -- and cites a cryopreservation consent form the couple had signed that stipulated that if they were to divorce, the embryos would be discarded.

The Texas Supreme Court will decide whether to hear the case later this year.

Who do you think is right? Should the courts allow her to use the embryos? Should Randy just allow Augusta to use the frozen embryos or should he stand firm?