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Live From Studio 1A: Birth Order and IQ

What do Albert Einstein, Winston Churchill and Oprah Winfrey have in common? All, of course, went on to become hugely successful in their respective fields, and all were first-born children in their families -- a potentially significant factor in the shaping of their intelligence.According to a study published last week in the journal Science, first-born children tend to have a higher IQ than t

What do Albert Einstein, Winston Churchill and Oprah Winfrey have in common? All, of course, went on to become hugely successful in their respective fields, and all were first-born children in their families -- a potentially significant factor in the shaping of their intelligence.

According to a study published last week in the journal Science, first-born children tend to have a higher IQ than their younger siblings. This morning, Dr. Nancy Snyderman, parenting expert Michele Borba and Meredith discussed the study's findings and its implications. WATCH VIDEO

The researchers analyzed the IQ scores of 250,000 men in Norway between 1985 and 2004, determining that eldest children held an advantage of 2.3 IQ points over their younger siblings -- a small difference, but one that the researchers argued could have a significant impact on college admissions.

The researchers also found that the disparity was due to the psychological interplay between parents and kids rather than biological factors -- more "nuture" than "nature."

So where do you fall in the birth order? Do you believe that first-born children have advantages over their younger siblings that allow them to get into a better college and eventually become more successful? Or do you think that by using IQ as the basis of the analysis, the researchers' study is inherently flawed?