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TODAY   |  August 29, 2013

Was Clinton’s ‘gridlock’ remark a dig at Obama?

During his speech at the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech, former President Bill Clinton told the crowd he believed King “did not live and die to hear his heirs whine about political gridlock.” Some consider it a dig at President Obama’s relationship with Congress.

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This content comes from Closed Captioning that was broadcast along with this program.

>>> president clinton roused the crowd yesterday with his speech at the 50th anniversary of the march on washington . but there was one line in particular that a lot of people wondered about. take a listen.

>> martin luther king did not live and die to hear his heirs crying about political gridlock.

>> some people are asking this morning, was clinton basically putting down president obama , who, of course, has consistently blamed congress and republicans for the political gridlock that's gripping washington? did it as recently as an interview yesterday. i don't know about this. it does seem like you can see why some people thought it was a putdown. on the other hand, presidents all the time complain about congress.

>> yes, they do.

>> president clinton was probably making commentary about the washington political culture . but --

>> however --

>> -- president clinton does like to remind you from time to time of his own greatness.

>> can we just say this of president clinton ? take a look. he's talked about this issue before.

>> let's make decisions. this institutionalized delay and gridlock is bad for america.

>> maybe he was talking about himself wihining about gridlock.

>> he could have been including everybody.

>> both sides have complained. but president obama certainly has talked a lot about political gridlock.

>> one of his favorite topics.

>> tamron's suspicious.

>> i think, you know, these days people try to read into every little word. congress has an 11% approval rating. so it's likely he was talking about all of congress. that's what i think.