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    Timeless New York street scenes, discovered after nearly 50 years

    Amateur photographer Frank Larson captured New York City in the 50s. His thousands of negatives had been stashed away in an attic since his death in 1964. But recently, a grandson discovered them.

  • Timeless New York street scenes, discovered after nearly 50 years

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    While looking through his aunt's attic, Soren Larson found a treasure trove: His grandfather, an amateur photographer named Frank Oscar Larson whom Soren describes as the "family shutterbug," had taken a remarkable collection of New York street scene photos in the 1950s.

    The pictures had been tucked away in the attic since 1964, when Frank Larson died. Soren developed some of the negatives, and brought them to the Queens Museum of Art, where they are currently on exhibit.

    In this photo, taken through a window in April 1954, the crew of TODAY gets ready for a show segment.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
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    The photos depict street scenes that, according to the Queens Museum, "are at once universal and personal."

    Here, three young ladies prepare to have their pictures taken in Manhattan photo booths in April 1954.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
  • This shot, taken on a rainy day across from St. Patrick's Cathedral, is one of thousands of snaps found in an attic in 2009. After his two sons left home, Frank Larson found more time to fulfill his passion for picture-taking.  <br><br>
				The thousands of negatives discovered, according to the Queens Museum of Art, were organized into more than 100 envelopes onto which Larson had carefully noted the locations, dates and times they were taken.

    Timeless New York street scenes, discovered after nearly 50 years

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    This shot, taken on a rainy day across from St. Patrick's Cathedral, is one of thousands of snaps found in an attic in 2009. After his two sons left home, Frank Larson found more time to fulfill his passion for picture-taking.

    The thousands of negatives discovered, according to the Queens Museum of Art, were organized into more than 100 envelopes onto which Larson had carefully noted the locations, dates and times they were taken.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
  • This photo shows a rainy evening in New York's Times Square under the neon lights of the "Black Widow" marquee. 
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				The bustling tourist area was a favorite photo setting of Larson's, according to the Queens Museum: Since Times Square is illuminated around the clock, he could disappear into the crowd at night and needed no flash to get his shots.

    Timeless New York street scenes, discovered after nearly 50 years

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    This photo shows a rainy evening in New York's Times Square under the neon lights of the "Black Widow" marquee.

    The bustling tourist area was a favorite photo setting of Larson's, according to the Queens Museum: Since Times Square is illuminated around the clock, he could disappear into the crowd at night and needed no flash to get his shots.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
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    A group of businessmen huddle together at the window of the Associated Press office at Rockefeller Center to read the latest news in this photo, entitled "AP Window, 1955."

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
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    The Chrysler Building is reflected in a sidewalk puddle on 42nd St. in April 1954.

    Born in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, the photographer, Frank Larson, worked as a banker for 40 years, but had a deep and enduring love of art, which he explored in many forms to escape from 9-5 office life.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
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    Two men chat in a coffee shop window near Times Square in April 1954.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
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    A Ballantine beer truck stops to make a delivery in front of the NBC Television Theatre.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
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    A not-so-naked cowboy? A street performer promotes the film "Johnny Guitar" on the sidewalks of Times Square in Spring, 1954.

    These days, Times Square has its own music man, though he's wearing much less clothing. It's a fun example of the timeless quality of Larson's work.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
  • A woman suns herself outside the entrance to the New York Public Library in 1955 in this photo, called "Lady and the Lion."

    Timeless New York street scenes, discovered after nearly 50 years

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    A woman suns herself outside the entrance to the New York Public Library in 1955 in this photo, called "Lady and the Lion."

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
  • A group poses for a picture at Pier 86, on 46th Street.

    Timeless New York street scenes, discovered after nearly 50 years

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    A group poses for a picture at Pier 86, on 46th Street.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
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    Professional skaters make a gutsy move in this shot, taken at the Rockefeller Center rink.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
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    Two parade officials watch New York's Saint Patrick's Day parade pass by on Fifth Avenue as one of them sneaks a cigarette break.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
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    The view from the top of a Rockefeller Center escalator looks out onto Fifth Avenue.

    "Larson was an avid, compassionate observer of the life of the streets, and in his eyes, the mundane became miraculous," said Queens Museum of Art archives manager Louise Weinberg, who curated the exhibition, in a release.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
  • This photo, entitled, "School Girls," captured a candid moment in 1953.

    Timeless New York street scenes, discovered after nearly 50 years

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    This photo, entitled, "School Girls," captured a candid moment in 1953.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
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    "Shoe Shine" is part of a collection of Larson's photos called "At Work and at Play." The pictures capture cops, delivery men, construction workers, cooks, cobblers and kids, just going about their business.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
  • A man works on New York City souvenirs with his sewing machine in November 1954.

    Timeless New York street scenes, discovered after nearly 50 years

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    A man works on New York City souvenirs with his sewing machine in November 1954.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
  • A woman peers out from a ticket booth of a movie theater in New York's Times Square in 1954. One thing that hasn't endured since Frank Larson took these photos: the price of a ticket.

    Timeless New York street scenes, discovered after nearly 50 years

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    A woman peers out from a ticket booth of a movie theater in New York's Times Square in 1954. One thing that hasn't endured since Frank Larson took these photos: the price of a ticket.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
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    Pigeons gather in Times Square on a rainy day in 1954 in front of the marquee for "A Star is Born," starring Judy Garland. Further down the block is the billboard for "On the Waterfront," starring Marlon Brando.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art
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    A look inside the TODAY windows shows a crew hard at work. Reflected in the window, you can see the crowd that, much like they do these days, has gathered to look on.

    For more remarkable New York scenes, See Frank Oscar Larson's website . The exhibit, at the Queens Museum of Art, also features personal memorabilia and family photographs.

    Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art