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Michelle Williams was 'inconsolable' after leaving home shared with Heath Ledger

Michelle Williams is opening up about the heartache she experienced when she and daughter Matilda, 11, moved away from the Brooklyn home they once shared with Matilda's dad, late actor Heath Ledger.

"At that time, I was inconsolable,” the "Manchester By The Sea" star tearfully revealed to WSJ. magazine in the February issue, “because I felt, ‘How will he be able to find us?’"

Jeff Kravitz / FilmMagic, Inc
Michelle Williams worried late actor Heath Ledger's spirit would not be able to find her and their daughter, Matilda, when they moved from the Brooklyn home the family lived in together.

"This is where we lived, and he won’t know where we are. And now I can’t believe I thought that," Williams, 36, continued. "Maybe that’s what’s making me cry is I feel sad for the person who thought he won’t be able to locate (us).”

The three-time Oscar nominee was just 27 when Ledger died from an accidental drug overdose in January 2008. The couple were together for three years, but split up just a few months before Ledger's tragic death.

RELATED: Michelle Williams selling Brooklyn home she shared with Heath Ledger

Years after Ledger's passing, Williams dated "How I Met Your Mother" star Jason Segel and film director Spike Jonze, but says she's ruled out the idea of finding a fairy-tale romance for herself.

"It’s hard to romanticize romance when you’re 36," Williams said. "When you’ve been a parent for 11 years and you’ve done it alone, you don’t have romantic ideals, because you have a practical understanding that you can do it by yourself."

"The romantic idea of meeting your person and having a storybook family life that looks like the model you grew up with," she continued, "that doesn’t really exist for me."

RELATED: Michelle Williams says raising daughter without Heath Ledger 'won't ever be right'

Parenting Matilda alone isn't always easy, she says, but friendships with other single moms help: "Sometimes it can feel alienating; at school functions, there’s only two of us single mothers."

"Everyone else has a partner," she said, "so we buddy up.”

The February issue of WSJ. Magazine hits newsstands on Jan. 28.

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