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Here's how 'Frozen' was originally going to end — and why it changed

"Frozen" fans, have we got a scoop for you!

The 2013 animated blockbuster's original ending was dramatically different from the ending fans know and love.

Actress Kristen Bell, who voiced the character of Anna, revealed in 2014 that ice queen Elsa was originally 100 percent villainous. Now, "Frozen" producer Peter Del Vecho elaborates, telling Entertainment Weekly that it was Elsa who let filmmakers know who she was — and changed the movie by doing so.

Disney / AP
The character of Elsa gradually revealed herself more and more to the movie's producers.

"So, when we started off, Anna and Elsa were not sisters. They weren’t even royal," Del Vecho told the magazine. Elsa was "a villain and pure evil — much more like the Hans Christian Andersen tale."

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Christopher Polk / Getty Images
"Frozen" star Kristen Bell revealed in 2014 that the original Elsa character was a straightforward villain.

The same prophecy about a "ruler with a frozen heart" was in the early draft, but in that version audiences would assume it was about Elsa, whose heart metaphorically froze when she was left at the altar on her wedding day.

In the original ending, evil Elsa creates a snow monster army to attack the movie's heroes while two-faced Prince Hans reveals he's the one with a frozen heart when he triggers an avalanche to stop the attack — not caring that it could destroy all of Arendelle.

Disney
Hans and Anna

Anna persuades Elsa to use her powers to save the kingdom, Elsa's heart "unfreezes," and she's saved.

But that ending fell flat, Del Vecho said: "It wasn’t satisfying. We had no emotional connection to Elsa —we didn’t care about her because she had spent the whole movie being the villain."

So the movie's creators began asking questions: What if Elsa weren't a villain? What if she and Anna were sisters?

Disney
Anna and Elsa were not sisters, or princess, in the original version of "Frozen."

"Making them related led us to the idea of her living in fear of her powers," Del Vecho continued. “What if she’s afraid of who she is? And afraid of hurting the ones she loves? Now we had a character in Anna who was all about love and Elsa who was all about fear."

In the end, Elsa became good, said Del Vecho, and the message of "Frozen" became "that love is stronger than fear."

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