Pop Culture

Get happy! ‘The Partridge Family’ stars reunite

It’s been 40 years since “The Partridge Family” drove their creatively painted bus to the top of both the Nielsen ratings and the music charts. But for some of the cast, life continues to imitate art.

Danny Bonaduce, the smart-mouthed brat who was always stirring up mischief, is still firing off deprecating wisecracks and getting in trouble. David Cassidy, the rock-star teen idol, is still touring the world and playing to sold-out stadiums, arenas and concert halls. Shirley Jones, the singing mother of the musical screen family, continues to sing and act.

“My whole career was launched” on the show, Cassidy told TODAY’s Matt Lauer Tuesday in New York, where he (Keith Partridge), Bonaduce (Danny Partridge) and fellow cast members Brian Forster (Chris Partridge) and Suzanne Crough (Tracy Partridge) reunited for the first time in nearly 20 years.

“I’ve been blessed to be able to say I’m still out singing those great songs, playing hits. To touch so many people’s lives and bring light into them — it brings light into my life now,” Cassidy said. “Every day of my life, someone comes up to me and says, you brought so much happiness to me and so much joy to me.”

From stardom to Office Max
Bonaduce, after well-publicized battles with drug and alcohol addiction as well as a period of homelessness, also continues to perform — now as a radio personality on WYSP in Philadelphia.

Crough and Forster live considerably less public lives.

“I’m [a] semi-retired, underemployed actor, musician, race-car driver,” Forster said with a laugh.

“I’m an office manager for Office Max,” Crough reported. “I have two daughters, I’m married, I have a normal job.”

Although “The Partridge Family” was about a musical group, the cast members admitted to Lauer that Cassidy and Jones — his real-life stepmother — were the only members who actually sang. (It wasn’t a secret; the real musicians were accurately credited on their albums.)

“I was very good at being Milli Vanilli,” Crough joked. And Bonaduce was so clueless that he had to be told by Cassidy that the bass guitar he held was supposed to be plucked and not strummed.

THE PARTRIDGE FAMILY, Shirley Jones, Danny Bonaduce, Brian Forster, Suzanne Crough, Susan Dey, David Cassidy, 1970-74

Even Cassidy, who was a musician as well as an actor, had to fight to get the producers to allow him to sing for real on the show. As he told Lauer, he was hired for his teen-idol looks, not his musical ability.

“Doing the pilot, I was lip-syncing somebody else’s voice,” Cassidy said. Only when the show was picked up by ABC was he allowed to sing.

Bigger than the Beatles
In very little time, David Cassidy was a bigger star than the Beatles. His 1970 hit “I Think I Love You” was the biggest record of the year, with more than 5 million sales.

“He outsold the Beatles in 1970. ‘I Think I Love You’ came out on the same day as ‘Let It Be,’ ” Bonaduce said of Cassidy. “ ‘I Think I Love You’ topped at No. 1. ‘Let It Be’ stopped at No. 6.”

(Editor's note: Bonaduce's musical history is a little off. Actually, “Let It Be” topped the charts earlier that same year. It was the No. 1 Billlboard song for two weeks [April 11 and April 18]. “I Think I Love You” hit No. 1 the week of Nov. 21.)

Having tasted teen idoldom, Cassidy said he has great sympathy for young idols like film star Robert Pattinson of the “Twilight” series. “The world and the culture is so different now,” Cassidy said. “I can’t even imagine having to deal with the TMZ concept. Our culture is so celebrity-obsessed now. It was nothing like that, thank God.”

“The Partridge Family” achieved its success in spite of mixed reviews. The Christian Science Monitor was decidedly unimpressed with a show about a single mother of five who packs the kids into a brightly colored bus and earns a living singing pop songs.

“Would that every fatherless, financially distressed American family could successfully take up guitars against a sea of troubles like grin-and-bear-it Shirley Partridge and her five winsome moppets,” the review read. “The show stacks implausibility upon implausibility, from the hit record to the psychedelic bus they tool around in. Danny Bonaduce as the 10-year-old wheeler-dealer provides a few faintly funny moments, but it's all so predictable that the viewer is left with a sense of wasted time and effort — not the least of which was his own.”

But the public saw something else. First there was the music, which was hugely popular with the public. And there was something about the plucky mom and the boisterous kids and the romance of the open road.

“I think it touched a nerve in everybody at the time, coming out of the ’60s and still having that freewheeling kind of thing,” Cassidy said. Wherever he goes, he went on, he hears from people who all say the same thing: “Wouldn’t it be cool to be traveling around and playing music and having the opportunity to tour and be rock stars?”

He ain’t sexy, he’s my brotherCassidy was 19, but had the androgynous good looks of someone younger. Girls fell in love with him on sight; rumor has it that Susan Dey, who played Laurie Partridge, was one of the females smitten by his charms.

But Crough said his allure was lost on her. “All my friends were going, ‘I love David. Don’t you love David?’ and I would say, ‘No. He’s like my brother. That’s creepy.’ ”

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    TV’s greatest families

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    Original run: 1951-57

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    On air: 1952-66

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    On air: 1953-1967

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    On air: 1954-1963

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    My Three Sons -

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    On air: 1960-72

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    The Addams Family -

    Based on macabre New Yorker cartoons by Charles Addams, the “mysterious and spooky” Addamses inhabited a gloomy mansion with their support staff: Lurch the butler, who was summoned by pulling a hangman’s noose, and Thing, a disembodied hand. They inspired a knockoff show, The Munsters, three movies, several animated series and other spinoffs.

    On air: 1964-66

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    Bewitched -

    Part of the 1960s boom of fantasy sitcoms, Bewitched starred Elizabeth Montgomery as an attractive sorceress who promised her ad-man hubby she’d renounce witchcraft, but just couldn’t resist casting spells with a twitch of her nose. Family members included her disapproving mom Endora and daughter Tabitha, who inherited her magical powers and later grew up to get a sitcom of her own.

    On air: 1964-72

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    Lost in Space -

    They were a sci-fi version of the Swiss Family Robinson, only these Robinsons were marooned in outer space instead of a tropical island. Though early episodes concerned the entire clan, the show soon narrowed its focus to young Will (Billy Mumy), sneaky stowaway Dr. Smith (Jonathan Harris), and the Robot, who constantly warned: "Danger, Will Robinson!"

    On air: 1965-68

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    The Brady Bunch -

    "'When the lady met this fellow, and they knew that it was much more than a hunch, that this group would somehow form a family. That's the way we all became the Brady Bunch!" This classic portrayal of a blended family became a smash hit at a time when divorces and remarriages were on the rise in the United States. But to play it safe, network execs avoided mentioning how mom and stepmother Carol's first marriage ended – leading many viewers to conclude that she must have been widowed.

    On air: 1969-74

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    The Partridge Family -

    Inspired by real-life family rock band The Cowsills, this sitcom starred Shirley Jones as a widowed mom who finds herself the head of a brood with Top 40 hits. Life imitated art when the show spawned hit recordings, and costar David Cassidy became a real-life teen idol. Susan Dey and Danny Bonaduce also went on to long careers.

    On air: 1970-74

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    All in the Family -

    Creator Norman Lear’s sitcom about “lovable bigot” Archie Bunker, his “dingbat” wife, daughter, and liberal-minded son-in-law broke new ground what topics could be talked about on television: racial prejudice, homosexuality and breast cancer, to name just a few. The show won a raft of Emmys and spawned a sequel series, Archie Bunker’s Place, that ran four additional years.

    On air: 1971-79

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  • The Cast Of 'The Waltons'

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    The Waltons -

    In 1992, President George H. W. Bush said he wanted to "make American families a lot more like the Waltons and a lot less like the Simpsons." The gentle period drama following a Virginia family through the Great Depression and World War II ran nine years and spawned half a dozen TV-movie sequels.

    On air: 1972-81

    CBS / CBS
  • Kevin Loud;William Loud [& Family];Lance Loud;Michele Loud;Delilah Loud;Grant Loud

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    An American Family -

    The mother of all reality shows, this PBS documentary series startled the nation with its candid portrait of the Loud family of Southern California, who grappled before the cameras with such painful issues as Bill and Pat Loud’s divorce and their son Lance’s open homosexuality. In 1973, the family appeared on the cover of Newsweek.

    On air: 1973

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    Good Times -

    A spinoff of a spinoff, Good Times was about Florida Evans -- the household maid on Maude, the liberal offshoot of All in the Family -- and her family, who lived in a Chicago housing project. The show was one of the first to candidly portray African-Americans struggling with economic challenges. It made Jimmie Walker a star with the catchphrase "dy-no-mite," but costars Esther Rolle and John Amos reportedly felt Walker's character reinforced a negative stereotype.

    On air: 1974-79

    CBS via Everett Collection / CBS via Everett Collection
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    Little House on the Prairie -

    Based on beloved books by Laura Ingalls Wilder, this sweet-natured period drama starred Michael Landon as the head of a farm family in late 19th-century Minnesota. The show ran 184 episodes and won many awards.

    On air: 1974-82

    NBC / NBC
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    One Day at a Time -

    This sitcom starred Bonnie Franklin as one of television's first divorcees to be a major character: Ann Romano, single mom of two teen daughters. Nowadays it is better remembered for making stars of Mackenzie Phillips and Valerie Bertinelli. Pat Cooper played their building's super.

    On air: 1975-84

    CBS / CBS
  • MEREDITH BAXTER-BIRNEY, SADA THOMPSON, GARY FRANK, KRISTY MCNICHOL, QUINN CUMMINGS, JAMES BRODERICK

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    Family -

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    On air: 1976-80

    ABC / ABC
  • ABC's "Eight Is Enough"

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    Eight Is Enough -

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    On air: 1977-81

    ABC / ABC
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    Dallas -

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    On air: 1978-1991

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    Dynasty -

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    On air: 1981-89

    ABC / ABC
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    Family Ties -

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    On air: 1982-89

    NBC / NBC
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    The Cosby Show -

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    On air: 1984-1992

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    Who's the Boss? -

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    On air: 1984-92

    Columbia Pictures Television via Everett Collection / Columbia Pictures Television via Everett Collection
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    227 -

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    On air:1985-90

    Colubmia Pictures Television via Everett Collection / Colubmia Pictures Television via Everett Collection
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    Full House -

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    On air: 1987-95

    ABC / ABC
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    Married... with Children -

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    On air: 1987-97

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    The Wonder Years -

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    On air: 1988-1993

    Warner Bros. via Everett Colletion / Warner Bros. via Everett Colletion
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    Roseanne -

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    On air: 1988-1997

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    Murphy Brown -

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    On air: 1988-98

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    Family Matters -

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    On air: 1989-98

    Warner Bros. via Everett Collection. / Warner Bros. via Everett Collection.
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    The Simpsons -

    Originally an interstitial cartoon on The Tracey Ullman Show, The Simpsons became one of the first hits on the fledgling Fox network. Winner of 25 Emmys, the show about the dysfunctional yellow people from Springfield was still going strong after 21 seasons and more than 450 episodes, not to mention a feature film.

    On air: 1989-

    Fox / Fox
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    The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air -

    After topping the music charts, rapper Will Smith turned to acting in the sitcom is about a Philadelphia teenager who was sent to live with his wealthy relatives in Los Angeles and had to adjust a luxurious new lifestyle. The entire premise of the show was laid out in its memorable and popular theme song. Executive producer Quincy Jones could be seen in the opening sequnce as the cab driver who takes Will to his aunt and uncle's mansion.

    On air: 1990-1996

    NBC / NBC
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    The Sopranos -

    A critical and popular smash and pop-culture milestone, this HBO drama followed New Jersey crime boss Tony Soprano and his brood. It won 21 Emmys and five Golden Globes, and is widely considered one of television's greatest achievements. The final episode's abrupt and ambiguous ending stirred water-cooler debate from coast to coast.

    On air:1999-2007

    HBO / HBO
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    George Lopez -

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    Reality-TV families -

    The success of The Osbournes (upper left) brought a rash of reality shows about families, including The Real Housewives of Orange County (top center) and Living Lohan (top right); (middle, left to right) Jon & Kate Plus 8, Hogan Knows Best, and Growing Up Gotti; and (bottom, left to right) Breaking Bonaduce, Meet the Barkers, and Keeping Up with the Kardashians.

    MTV, Bravo, E!, TLC, VH1, A&E, VH1, MTV, E1 / MTV, Bravo, E!, TLC, VH1, A&E, VH1, MTV, E1
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    Arrested Development -

    With the patriarch in prison, an alcoholic mother, three grown kids completely unable to take care of themselves, two cousins in love with each other and one man trying to hold the clan together, the Bluths were one of TV’s most dysfunctional -- and hilarious -- families. The show was filmed in documentary fashion, with handheld camera shots and flashback footage. Produced by Ron Howard, Arrested Devlopment was canceled after three seasons despite winning six Emmy awards and a Golden Globe. The show became a cult hit on DVD.

    On air: 2003-06

    Fox via Everett Collection / Fox via Everett Collection
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    Two and a Half Men -

    This hit sitcom played off the rakish reputation of its star, Charlie Sheen, a swinging bachelor who welcomes his strait-laced brother (played by Jon Cryer) and young nephew into his beach house. In 2010, production of the show paused when Sheen entered rehab.

    On air: 2003-

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    Everybody Hates Chris -

    Inspired by the teenage experiences of comedian Chris Rock, the show revolves around the everyday life of Chris and his family living in the Bedford-Stuyvesant area of Brooklyn in the mid '80s. The series featured many famous guest actors, including Jackee Harry (227), Ernest Lee Thomas (What’s Happening!!) and Jason Alexander (Seinfeld).

    On air: 2005-2009

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    Big Love -

    Surely one of the most unconventional family dramas ever to come to television, Big Love starred Bill Paxton as a member of a polygamist sect in Utah with three wives, played by Chloe Sevigny, Jeanne Tripplehorn, and Ginnifer Goodwin. The Church of Latter-Day Saints criticized the show for blurring the distinction between its characters and mainstream Mormons.

    On air: 2006-

    HBO / HBO
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    Modern Family -

    This mocumentary-style comedy series is modern indeed: Among the three interconnected clans it follows are two dads with an adopted Vietnamese baby, as well as a man in late middle age with a Colombian bombshell wife and (pictured) a youth-obsessed dad who thinks he's "down" with his three kids. The show drew critical acclaim and a number of awards.

    On air: 2009-

    ABC / ABC

The TV family was like a real family, Bonaduce said. Although onscreen he was at constant war with Dave Madden’s character, manager Reuben Kincaid, the young actor spent nearly every weekend with his co-star.

“He was like a father to me, and did a better job than the first,” Bonaduce said. And Jones, he added, “was like a mother to me ... she tried to ground me a couple of times.”

Jones, who is 75, could not join the four on TODAY because of a performing tour she’s currently on, singing with 17 symphony orchestras in 17 nights.

Dey, who has cut off contact with fellow cast members, was also absent, as was Madden, who doesn’t like to fly.

The TODAY Classic TV Families Reunited series began Monday with a reunion from another ’70s hit, “Eight Is Enough,” and concludes Wednesday with a “227” reunion.

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