Pop Culture

Big names pay tribute to Cronkite

Walter Cronkite's death is eliciting reaction from notable names across the country. Here's a sampling:

"For decades, Walter Cronkite was the most trusted voice in America. His rich baritone reached millions of living rooms every night, and in an industry of icons, Walter set the standard by which all others have been judged. He was there through wars and riots, marches and milestones, calmly telling us what we needed to know. And through it all, he never lost the integrity he gained growing up in the heartland.

But Walter was always more than just an anchor. He was someone we could trust to guide us through the most important issues of the day; a voice of certainty in an uncertain world. He was family. He invited us to believe in him, and he never let us down. This country has lost an icon and a dear friend, and he will be truly missed."President Barack Obama

" As a pioneer in television journalism, he was a towering, respected figure. Many Americans heard it from Walter first that President Kennedy had died, or that man had walked on the moon. He is already missed." — former President George H. W. Bush

"He was a great broadcaster and a gentleman whose experience, honesty, professionalism and style defined the role of anchor and commentator."Leslie Moonves, CBS Corp. chief executive

"Elaine and I are saddened by the passing of Walter Cronkite. One of the most iconic news reporters of the 20th Century, Walter Cronkite brought some of the most significant events in history into living rooms across America. He will be forever memorialized as a pioneer in broadcast news, and remembered fondly by legions of Americans as one of the most trusted men in America."U.S. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell

"It takes someone truly gifted to make the entire country feel like he was a member of the family. We are all better for his pioneering work and the journalism world will forever be shaped by what he accomplished."Steve Capus, president, NBC News

"For a news analyst and reporter of the happenings of the day to be successful, he or she needs three things: accuracy, timeliness, and the trust of the audience. Many are fortunate to have the first two. The trust of the audience must be earned. Walter Cronkite seemed to enjoy the highest of ratings. He had a passion for human space exploration, an enthusiasm that was contagious, and the trust of his audience. He will be missed." — Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong

"What was so remarkable about it was that he was not only in the midst of so many great stories, he was also the managing editor of CBS News and the managing editor for America. Walter always made us better. He set the bar so high." —

Former NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw

"He was such a nice person on top of everything else. Generally you get in these fights, and you can't pick your allies. But if you had to pick an ally, then Cronkite was a perfect person." — Ben Bradlee, vice president at-large of The Washington Post

  • Slideshow Photos

    Hulton Archive

    CBS Newsmen

    Walter Cronkite: 1916-2009

    The “most trusted man in America” made his mark on the news industry and the world.

  • CBS Newsmen

    Walter Cronkite: 1916-2009

    of

    'And that's the way it is' -

    Bill Leonard, left, executive producer of the CBS News Election Unit talks with CBS News correspondent Walter Cronkite, who was the anchorman for the network's coverage of the New Hampshire Primary Election, in Manchester, N.H., in 1965. Cronkite joined the CBS News team in 1950 and was recruited by Edward R. Murrow. He became the anchor on April, 16, 1962, and used the phrase, "... and that's the way it is" followed by the date to end most of his broadcasts.

    Getty Images / Getty Images
  • Walter Cronkite: 1916-2009

    of

    The news crew -

    Cronkite is framed against a bank of CBS News correspondents in 1961. As a newsman, Cronkite had an unflappable calmness.

    Everett Collection / Everett Collection
  • Walter Cronkite: 1916-2009

    of

    From the war zone -

    Cronkite, in Vietnam in 1968, left the anchor desk to report on the aftermath of the Tet Offensive. Upon his return, he departed from his usual objectivity, declaring that the war could end only in protracted stalemate. President Lyndon Johnson reportedly told his staff, "If I've lost Cronkite, I've lost middle America."

    CBS via Everett Collection / CBS via Everett Collection
  • Walter Cronkite: 1916-2009

    of

    Not all serious business -

    Cronkite, right, makes an appearance with Bob Keeshan on the "Captain Kangaroo" television program on Nov. 3, 1970. After Keeshan's death in 2004, Cronkite recalled his CBS colleague as "always cheerful" and "a kind of joy to man."

    Everett Collection / Everett Collection
  • Walter Cronkite: 1916-2009

    of

    America's news anchor -

    Cronkite anchored the CBS Evening News for 19 years and was often called "the most trusted man in America." He reported on the most traumatic and triumphant moments in American life in the 1960s, from the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963 to the Apollo moon landing in 1969.

    Everett Collection / Everett Collection
  • Walter Cronkite: 1916-2009

    of

    Standing up for free speech -

    Cronkite believed government control over broadcasting was like a threatening ax hanging over the industry. On Sept. 30, 1971, Cronkite went before a Senate sub-committee to testify on freedom of the press.

    AP / AP
  • Walter Cronkite: 1916-2009

    of

    The king in his castle -

    Cronkite is interviewed in his CBS office at the broadcast center in New York on Feb. 3, 1981, the year he retired. President Jimmy Carter awarded the anchorman with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

    AP / AP
  • Walter Cronkite, Betsey Cronkite

    Walter Cronkite: 1916-2009

    of

    65 years of marriage -

    Accompanied by his wife Betsey, Cronkite leaves London's Heathrow Airport for New York via Concorde on May 26, 1983. Betsey and Walter were married on March 30, 1940 and remained together until her death on March 16, 2005. The couple had three children: Nancy, Kathy and Walter III.

    AP / AP
  • Walter Cronkite: 1916-2009

    of

    That's entertainment -

    Cronkite, right, meets with anchor Ted Baxter (Ted Knight) and producer Mary Richards (Mary Tyler Moore) as he makes an appearance at the "Mary Tyler Moore Show" in Los Angeles on Feb. 4, 1974. In the episode, Baxter tries to convince Cronkite that he's as good a newsman as Eric Sevareid.

    AP / AP
  • Former CBS anchor Walter Cronkite testifies 20 Feb

    Walter Cronkite: 1916-2009

    of

    Never one to back down -

    Cronkite testifies Feb. 20, 1991, in Washington before the U.S. Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs concerning the Pentagon rules on media access to the Persian Gulf War. Cronkite said military escorts in the gulf were having a chilling effect on reporters' work.

    AFP/Getty Images / AFP/Getty Images
  • US President Bill Clinton (L) and Walter Cronkite

    Walter Cronkite: 1916-2009

    of

    President and pal -

    President Bill Clinton, left, and Cronkite walk along the dock toward Cronkite's boat in Edgartown, Mass. The Clintons sailed on Cronkite's boat during their vacation as the first family. In 1998, Cronkite voiced his support for Clinton during his impeachment trial.

    AFP/Getty Images / AFP/Getty Images
  • Vanity Fair 2007 Tribeca Film Festival Party

    Walter Cronkite: 1916-2009

    of

    Never stopped working -

    Cronkite attended the Vanity Fair Tribeca Film Festival party at The State Supreme Courthouse on April 24, 2007, in New York. Even after his retirement, he never stopped speaking out on topics he believed in, from the 2003 invasion of Iraq, which he condemned, to what he believed were the unethical news practices of Fox News.

    Getty Images For Tribeca Film Fe / Getty Images For Tribeca Film Fe

"America has lost an icon, our industry has lost its living giant, and all those who learned about the world from Walter Cronkite have lost an exceptional teacher."Brian Williams, anchor and managing editor, "Nightly News with Brian Williams"

“We were proud to work with him — for him — we loved him.”Mike Wallace, "60 Minutes" correspondent emeritus

"I will never forget our memorable visit together to Hanoi on the 10th anniversary of the fall of Saigon."Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.

"He was wise and good and fun. He was America at its best. We loved him dearly and shall miss him deeply." Luci Baines Johnson, daughter of former President Lyndon B. Johnson and Lady Bird Johnson

"A call, a note, a compliment from Walter was pretty much the Nobel Prize for a young reporter." — ABC News' Diane Sawyer, who worked at "60 Minutes"

0:00
 
0:00
Your video begins in
0:00
TOP