Parents

That amazing Bed, Bath & Beyond coupon for Mother's Day? It's fake

Bed, Bath & Beware! If you see an online coupon purportedly from Bed, Bath & Beyond promising $75 off an in-store purchase in honor of Mother’s Day, resist the urge to click it.

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Bed Bath & Beyond warns consumers about online Mother's Day coupon scams

Play Video - 2:35

Bed Bath & Beyond warns consumers about online Mother's Day coupon scams

Play Video - 2:35

The home goods retailer is warning shoppers that the coupon, which has been circulating on Facebook, is fake.

“We all know some things are too good to be true!" reads a recent post on the company's Facebook page. "We are sorry for any confusion and disappointment this fake coupon has caused. We are partnering with Facebook to have these coupons removed. Thank you for your understanding!”

Fact-checking website Snopes notes that the "coupon" displays a domain name that's not part of the company's legitimate website; users are then asked to follow simple instructions, like filling out a survey, which doesn't yield a coupon.

Judging by the comments underneath Bed, Bath & Beyond's post, the scam has indeed caused a lot of confusion and frustration. If you come across a coupon from the retailer and you’re not sure if it’s legit, the company encourages you to contact your local store or call its customer service phone number, 1-800-GO-BEYOND.

RELATED: Don't panic! 7 last-minute Mother's Day gifts that pack a sentimental punch

Unfortunately, this isn’t the only fake Mother’s Day deal out there. Lowe’s Home Improvement recently stated that Facebook coupons advertising $50 or $100 off a purchase are scams.

“These offers are a phishing scam to gather information and are not affiliated with Lowe's in any way,” it said in response to an inquiry from a Facebook user.

RELATED: Massive phishing attack targets millions of Gmail users

According to Snopes, these scams often result in a subscription for "difficult-to-cancel 'Reward Offers,' or simply the disclosure of personal details to social media grifters. In a best-case scenario such efforts are a simple but effective like-farming scam, which can lead to embarrassment if the 'liked' page is converted into an unpalatable one with risqué or rude content."

So as you shop online for Mother's Day, just remember: Some deals really are too good to be true, even when they’re for Mom.

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