Parents

Angelina Jolie talks motherhood: 'None of my kids want to be actors'

Angelina Jolie is one of the most famous moms in Hollywood, so naturally the actress, director and activist opened up about motherhood during an appearance on BBC Radio 4's "Woman's Hour" Friday morning, reports People.

Jolie, 41, talked about raising a bustling brood of six with husband Brad Pitt, as well as the joys of watching the kids develop their own interests — with multilingualism at the top of each one's list!

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Angelina Jolie arrives at the world premiere of "Kung Fu Panda 3" at the TCL Chinese Theatre on Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016, in Los Angeles.

"All the kids are learning different languages," Jolie said. "I asked them what languages they wanted to learn and Shi is learning Khmai, which is a Cambodian language, Pax is focusing on Vietnamese, Mad has taken to German and Russian, Z is speaking French, Vivienne really wanted to learn Arabic, and Knox is learning sign language."

(For the record, that's Shiloh, 10; Pax, 12; Maddox, 14; Zahara, 11; and twins Vivienne and Knox, 7.)

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Shiloh Nouvel Jolie-Pitt, Angelina Jolie, Vivienne Marcheline Jolie-Pitt, Knox Leon Jolie-Pitt, Zahara Marley Jolie-Pitt and Pax Thien Jolie-Pitt seen at DreamWorks Animation and Twentieth Century Fox World Premiere of 'Kung Fu Panda 3' at TCL Chinese Theater on Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016, in Hollywood, CA.

The Oscar winner seemed tickled that, so far, no one wants to follow mom and dad into the family business.

"None of my kids want to be actors," Jolie revealed. "They are actually very interested in being musicians. I think they like the process of film from the outside. Mad is interested in editing. Pax loves music and deejaying."

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Angelina Jolie, left, and Brad Pitt arrive at the 2015 AFI Fest opening night premiere of "By The Sea" on Thursday, Nov. 5, 2015, in Los Angeles.

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The actress also discussed her duties as a Special Envoy for the United Nations, which involve visiting people in refugee camps around the globe, all of whom live without access to adequate healthcare.

Jolie's experiences meeting women in the camps forced the actress to reflect on her choice to have a preventive double mastectomy in 2013 after genetic tests showed she had a high risk of developing breast cancer. Last year, after learning she carries the RCA1 gene mutation that elevates the risk of cancer, Jolie had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed.

Maddox Jolie-Pitt Foundation via Getty Images
Actress and activist Angelina Jolie Pitt meets children during a visit to Ja Mai Kaung Baptist refugee camp on July 30, 2015 in Myitkyina, Myanmar. Angelina Jolie Pitt is a Special Envoy of UN High Commissioner for Refugees since her 2012 appointment.

Options like those are unavailable to women refugees, the actress noted.

Information about such procedures was also unavailable to her mother Marcheline Bertrand, who died in 2007 after an eight-year battle with ovarian cancer.

That's something that haunts the actress.

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** FILE ** Angelina Jolie, right, is joined by her mother Marcheline Bertrand, at a film premiere in Los Angeles on Tuesday, July 31, 2001. Bertrand has died of cancer, her daughter said Sunday, Jan 28, 2007. Bertrand died Saturday afternoon in Los Angeles after a battle with cancer. (AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian)

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"When you go through something and you learn about yourself and your body in anything medical, you feel — it really wasn't a decision," said Jolie.

"It was just — I thought that I had gained information that I wish my mother would have known," she said. "I wish she had the option. I wish she had the surgery, in fact, and it might have given her more years with my family."

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