The Royals

Even royals do it! Queen Elizabeth photobombs athletes

July 24, 2014 at 9:04 AM ET

Queen Elizabeth turned a routine selfie by a pair of field hockey players into a royal photobomb on Thursday. 

When Australian national field hockey team members Jayde Taylor and Brooke Peris went to take a selfie during the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, Scotland on Thursday, they ended up with a surprise guest in the picture. Queen Elizabeth, 88, snuck up in the background and gave a wide smile for the camera through the mesh netting that was behind Taylor and Peris. 

“Brooke [Peris] and I planned it so that when she came out the door she would be behind us,'' Taylor told TODAY.com. "And then she came out and smiled at the camera. We were in the right spot at the right time.”


"Awesome photobomb by Her Majesty!" one commenter on Taylor's Instagram photo wrote. "Straight up legend!" 

It was an auspicious way to start the Games as Australia went on to a 4-0 win over Malaysia on Thursday as they look to defend their title from the 2010 Commonwealth Games. The players were then able to meet the Queen after the game. 

Video: Queen Elizabeth photobombed two members of the Australian national field hockey team taking a selfie during the Commonwealth Games in Scotland.

“We were warming down on the second pitch after our game and the Queen came out to meet Donny [Madonna Blyth, Australian women’s hockey captain],'' Taylor said. "The security guard led us all round and we got to meet her.

“She asked us a bit about the pitch, how we were going and told us to enjoy our time here. She was lovely, really, really lovely."

Taylor and Peris weren't the only ones to find the queen sneaking into one of their selfies either, as she conducted her photobombing campaign. 


The queen presided over the opening ceremony for the Commonwealth Games in front of a capacity crowd of 40,000 on Wednesday night. The Games are an 11-day, multi-sport event held every four years involving athletes from the 53 member states that are mainly territories of the former British empire. 

Follow TODAY.com writer Scott Stump on Twitter and Google+. 


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