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Nik Wallenda was 'working for every single foot' in Grand Canyon walk

June 24, 2013 at 8:50 AM ET

Video: Daredevil tightrope walker Nik Wallenda talks about his death-defying walk across the Grand Canyon Sunday night, saying it “differed quite a bit” from his training. He added that he was so wound up after the stunt, he “didn’t sleep at all.”

Daredevil Nik Wallenda had prepared for all types of scenarios in his high-wire walk across a section of the Grand Canyon on Sunday, but he had no idea the two-inch-thick steel cable would be moving so much when he stepped out on it.

Wallenda, 34, became the first person to walk across the Grand Canyon on a wire during the Discovery Channel’s “Skywire Live” special that was hosted by TODAY’s Natalie Morales and Willie Geist. It took Wallenda, who had no safety harness or net, 22 minutes and 54 seconds to traverse the 1,400-foot wire that was suspended 1,500 feet above ground.

“I wasn’t prepared for the movement of that cable,’’ Wallenda said on TODAY Monday. “The tension dropped down. We knew it was going to vary a little bit by temperatures throughout the day (that) would change the tension on the cable, but it dropped down to about 62,000 pounds. We wanted it at 65. Because of that, it was moving pretty wildly under my feet.”

Nik Wallenda, a seventh-generation member of the famous “Flying Wallendas” family, became the first person to walk across the Grand Canyon on a wire that's the width of two bottle caps.
Tiffany Brown / AP for Discovery / AP
Nik Wallenda became the first person to walk across the Grand Canyon on a wire that's the width of two bottle caps.

The seventh-generation member of the famous “Flying Wallendas” family was also buffeted by winds that clocked in at 48 miles per hour before he started his walk, which did not take place in Grand Canyon National Park but in the section of the Grand Canyon that is part of the Navajo Nation.

“There was no point where I thought I was going to fall for sure, but there were points where I was thinking, ‘Man, I wish I could just relax,’’’ Wallenda said. “I was hoping to talk to Natalie and Willie while I was on that cable, but there was just no way. I was working for every single foot to get across that wire.”

The biggest challenge Wallenda faced was strong gusts of wind, which clocked in at 48 miles per hour before he started his walk.
Tim Boyles / Getty Images Contributor
The biggest challenge Wallenda faced was strong gusts of wind, which clocked in at 48 miles per hour before he started his walk.

By the time he reached the other side — greeted by cheers and hugs from his family — he was practically already plotting his next death-defying feat. In 2012, he walked on a wire across Niagara Falls, and he had previously set seven Guinness World Records before Sunday’s stunt.

“I’m already two or three ahead of this one,’’ Wallenda said without giving specific details as to what may be next.

He did it! Daredevil Nik Wallenda wire walks across the Grand Canyon

A particularly dramatic moment in Sunday's walk came about 13 minutes into his feat when Wallenda stopped and kneeled down on the direction of his father, Terry Troffer, who served as his safety coordinator.

“What happens is — as I walk these cables — there’s no stabilization on them, so it builds a rhythm in them, and if I kept walking it just gets worse and worse, so I actually tried to stop for a little bit by the direction of my father,’’ he said. “He wanted me to slow down, speed up, bigger steps, smaller steps, and that’s really important in doing a walk like this.

“It’s easier said than done, of course, when you’re up 1,500 feet without a safety (harness). Your goal is to get across that wire, it’s not to slow down or speed up. It’s just to make it across safely.”

Video: Tightrope-walking daredevil Nik Wallenda is looking forward to his most death-defying stunt yet: crossing the Grand Canyon with no harness or safeguards in place. He talks to TODAY’s Natalie Morales and Willie Geist about what inspires him and how he has prepared for the stunt.

Tightrope walker Nik Wallenda walks the high wire from the U.S. side to the Canadian side over the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ontario, June 15,...
Mark Blinch / Reuters
Nik Wallenda walks the high-wire from the U.S. side to the Canadian side over the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ontario, on June 15, 2012.

At one point during his walk, he also thought about his great-grandfather, Karl Wallenda, who has been a major inspiration during his career. The elder Wallenda fell to his death in 1978 while performing a high-wire act in San Juan, Puerto Rico, at 73 years old.

“Everything he did paved the road for me to be able to fulfill my dreams, and everything I do is to honor him,’’ Wallenda said. “He did lose his life, (and) we do know why he lost his life. It had to do with rigging, and really rigging caused him to go down to the safety of the wire, and then there was the fact that he was 73 years old and didn’t have the strength to hold on.

Daredevil: 'No room for error' in Grand Canyon walk

“Worst-case last night, I would’ve went down to the wire and held on and waited for my rescue team to get to me. He just didn’t have the strength to do that, and we’ve learned that there’s a time to retire in our business, for sure.”

Nik Wallenda nears the end of his quarter mile high-wire walk. Wallenda said his faith helped him stay focused on making it to the other side.
Tiffany Brown / AP
Nik Wallenda is shown near the end of his quarter mile high-wire walk on Sunday. Wallenda said his faith helped him stay focused on making it to the other side.

While millions witnessing his walk were gripped by the tension, Wallenda did find a few moments to take it all in while he was out there. When he first stepped out on the wire, then when he knelt down, and finally when he was three-quarters of the way across, he took a moment to look down.

“If the wire was more stable, I would’ve been able to relax, for sure, and enjoy it a little bit more,’’ he said.

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