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Megyn Kelly joins NBC News — a look back at her 6 finest moments

During more than a decade as one of America's prominent news anchors, Megyn Kelly has had her share of memorable moments.

Kelly is now joining NBC News after being at Fox News since 2004, NBCUniversal News Group Chairman Andrew Lack announced Tuesday.

The host of "The Kelly File" and "America Live" on Fox News will become anchor of a new one-hour daytime program that will air Monday through Friday at a time to be announced in the coming months.

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As part of the multiyear agreement, Kelly will also anchor a new Sunday evening news magazine show and will become an important contributor to NBC’s breaking news coverage as well as the network's political and special events coverage.

Over the years at Fox and during recent interviews with other outlets, Kelly has gained notice for her stances on controversial issues and her comments about being a woman in a tough industry.

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Here is a look at some of Kelly's most memorable "Megyn Moments."

1. Fighting back against maternity leave being called 'a racket'

In 2011, Kelly fired back at radio host Mike Gallagher after he called her three-month maternity leave "a racket" on his show.

"What a moronic thing to say," she said to Gallagher on "America Live." "I want you to know that the United States is the only country in the advanced world that doesn’t require paid maternity leave. Now I happen to work for a nice employer that gives me paid maternity leave. But the United States is the only advanced country that doesn’t require paid leave.

"If anything, the United States is in the dark ages when it comes to maternity leave. And what is it about getting pregnant and carrying a baby for nine months that you don’t think deserves a few months off so bonding and recovery can take place?"

2. Challenging Karl Rove's math during the 2012 presidential election

On the night of the 2012 election in which Barack Obama defeated Mitt Romney, Kelly challenged Republican political consultant Karl Rove on his refusal to accept results showing Obama winning.

"Is this just math you do as a Republican to make yourself feel better, or is this real?" Kelly said.

3. Shutting down the notion that Barack Obama is a Muslim

In response to a panel discussing comments at a rally for Donald Trump regarding Muslims and President Barack Obama, Kelly disputed asking the question in the first place and clarified that he is not a Muslim.

"The president has said repeatedly that he is a Christian, that he is not a Muslim,'' Kelly said. "This was made a campaign issue even back in 2008, and this was put to bed even by John McCain, saying no. Now it resurrects itself in a question that was objectively ugly."

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4. Challenging Newt Gingrich

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich expressed outrage in October over the media devoting time to allegations of Donald Trump's alleged sexual advances on women, leading to an icy exchange with Kelly.

"You are fascinated with sex, and you don't care about public policy," Gingrich said.

"Me, really?" Kelly replied.

"That's what I get out of watching you tonight,'' Gingrich said.

"You know what, Mr. Speaker? I'm not fascinated by sex, but I am fascinated by the protection of women and understanding what we're getting in the Oval Office,'' Kelly answered.

She then ended the segment with a suggestion for Gingrich: "We're going to have to leave it at that, and you can take your anger issues and spend some time working on them, Mr. Speaker."

5. No precedent for a Muslim registry

When former Navy SEAL and Trump supporter Carl Higbie claimed in November there was precedent for a Muslim registry by citing Japanese internment camps in World War II, Kelly had a quick response.

"Come on, you’re not proposing we go back to the days of internment camps, I hope,'' she said. "You know better than to suggest that. You can't be citing Japanese internment camps as precedent for anything the president-elect is gonna do."

6. On dressing how she wants on air

Kelly made sure to note that she had no apologies for wearing a spaghetti-strap dress during the Republican National Convention in July that many complained on social media was too revealing.

"A convention is a kind of free-form extravaganza, and there are certain settings where you can take risks,'' she told The New York Times. "So I just thought: ‘Yes, I can do this. I can be smart and challenging while I wear spaghetti straps, and everyone is just going to have to get their heads around that.’”

Kelly emphasized that she dresses how she wants on air and that her choices give her strength.

"I felt very strongly, I was not going to be defined by what someone else deemed appropriate,'' she said.

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