Ken Bone becomes an internet legend after presidential debate

The latest presidential debate finally gave us a clear winner of American hearts and minds, a beacon of hope in a red cardigan and black-rimmed glasses.

With a name that sounds like the title of a new Netflix show, Ken Bone is the hero America needs right now.

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Man in the red sweater, Ken Bone, dubbed 'winner' of second presidential debate

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Man in the red sweater, Ken Bone, dubbed 'winner' of second presidential debate

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He's an undecided voter with a power 'stache who's just trying to get to the bottom of the energy policies proposed by Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. And then he'll be snapping some photos with his disposable camera and be on his way.

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Bone, 34, became an internet sensation the second he stood up at Sunday's live town hall debate to ask a question of the candidates.

"What steps will your energy policy take to meet our energy needs while at the same time remaining environmentally friendly and minimizing job layoffs?" he asked.

Something about his presence (as well as his stop sign red cardigan sweater) set Twitter alight.

He also may have instantly became one of this year's hottest Halloween costumes.

The story of the coal plant operator from Illinois only got better once he revealed that his now-legendary sweater was not his initial outfit for the debate. He was originally wearing an olive suit before he had a wardrobe malfunction.

"Apparently I've gained about 30 pounds, and when I went to get in my car I split the seat of my pants wide open, so the red sweater is Plan B," he told CNN. "I'm glad it worked out."

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Bone's adoring new fans immediately set out to remedy the situation, starting a GoFundMe page to raise money for a new olive suit.

Bone further endeared himself to America when he whipped out some old-school technology to capture a quick memory from the night.

He later told Jimmy Kimmel that he and his fellow undecided voters were not allowed to bring cell phones into the debate. They were given disposable cameras instead.

After the debate, Bone made sure to get a handshake with former president Bill Clinton. Or maybe it was Clinton who wanted to meet the legend himself.

Of course, Bone's popularity also soared on social media. His Twitter account went from single-digit followers to more than 80,000 in the blink of an eye. And you better believe he had fun with it.

In the end, he is the rare political figure that America can agree on.

Follow writer Scott Stump on Twitter.

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