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Get an exclusive first look inside Prince's home and studio, Paisley Park

TODAY received an exclusive preview of Paisley Park, one of the most iconic recording studios in the music industry, before it opens its doors for the first time to the public on Thursday.

Samantha Okazaki / TODAY
Prince recorded some of his greatest hits in the Studio A sound booth and control room, which is still set up just the way he liked it (Prince symbol, and all).

Al Roker toured the Minnesota estate that became Prince’s home and workshop, and which has been turned into a public museum and tribute to the music legend, who died from an accidental painkiller overdose in April.

Prince’s handwritten notes remain laying about inside the control room of Studio A, filled with his keyboard and guitars — just two of the 27 instruments he played on his records. Prince was using the studio to work on a jazz album that will be released in the future.

Samantha Okazaki / TODAY
Prince's hand-written notes.

In the Purple Rain room, visitors will see the script, guitar, and even one of the motorcycles Prince rode in the movie. The film generated an album that spent 27 weeks at the top of the charts and sold more than 20 million copies. It also earned a music Oscar for Prince, who became the first person to have the number one movie, song, and album at the same time.

Samantha Okazaki / TODAY
Prince's movie and multi-platinum album Purple Rain serves as the inspiration for this room, which includes this motorcycle.
Samantha Okazaki / TODAY
Prince's Academy Award for 'Purple Rain' and 2004 Grammy for 'Musicology' on display

Prince was known for his elaborate outfits, all of which were custom made, said Paisley Park’s archivist, Angie Marchese.

“He was a very tiny guy, which actually brings us to very unique and unusual circumstances, sometimes finding mannequins properly sized to be able to display the clothing,” she said.

Samantha Okazaki / TODAY
Prince was known for his complex and radical taste in fashion, but what many don't know is that he kept almost every outfit and he had a pair of matching shoes to go with each one. The archives now contain thousands of articles of clothing.

“Because like the Purple Rain outfits that you'll see here, Prince had a 22 and a half inch waist at the time, in 1984.”

But Prince rarely threw anything away, making her job a bit easier.

“We do have an amazing inventory because Prince saved everything,” Marchese said.

Samantha Okazaki / TODAY
Just outside of Studio A is Influence Hallway, featuring this custom-designed mural that represents Prince's greatest musical influences.

Al was joined on the tour by two of Prince’s sisters, Norrine and Sharon Nelson, who said their brother’s energy and spirit could definitely be felt in the exhibit, which they described as a good representation of his legacy.

"It is, and he did plan it to be a museum. Everything is strategically placed," Sharon Nelson said. "And when the fans come in they'll see that it is."

Her sister Norrine Nelson agreed.

“It’s truly Prince. He thought all this through," she said. "He had a vision and he finished it.”

Later, during a live interview with Prince's younger sister, Tyka Nelson confirmed that her brother had planned out much of what the museum looks like. She said she hopes guests will experience something personal during their visit.

"I want them to maybe feel like maybe they saw Prince up close," she said. "Sometimes when you’re a fan, you get to only to see them from a seat, but this way, you’re almost face-to-face with him."

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