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'Commitment rings' aim to stop 'Netflix infidelity' among binge-watching couples

Are you worried that your significant other is faking surprise at a plot twist in "House of Cards" because he or she has already watched it without telling you?

You may be a victim of "binge cheating."

Either that, or you're a perpetrator — the person who just can't stop yourself from watching three episodes ahead in "Orange is the New Black" without your partner knowing.

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Commitment rings aim to stop 'Netflix infidelity'

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Commitment rings aim to stop 'Netflix infidelity'

Play Video - 1:18

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But as it turns out, the solution to "Netflix infidelity" among couples may come from, of all places, an ice cream company.

The U.K. ice cream brand Cornetto aims to combat the issue with "commitment rings," wearable tech that features near-field communication (NFC) that links the rings to streaming services like Netflix, Amazon or Hulu for six months.

Users register the rings through an app and choose what shows they want to watch together. If the rings are not close to one another, the app will block the series from being watched. Cornetto has advertised the rings with the tag line, "Love should last more than one season."

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"This isn't real, c'mon,'' TODAY's Tamron Hall said on Monday. "There's no way."

"It's a real problem,'' Carson Daly said.

Real or not, the company says it is still ironing out the kinks and negotiating with streaming services. The rings aren't currently for sale and will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis online, according to Cornetto. The range of the rings also hasn't yet been determined, so it's unclear if sneaking off to your neighbor's place next door to fit in some "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" will get you busted.

"This is the 2016 ball and chain,'' Tamron added.

Follow TODAY.com writer Scott Stump on Twitter.

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