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Jason Ahn  /  The Sunburnt Cow
Down-under dude: Heathe St. Clair, the Australian chef-owner of The Sunburnt Cow.
By "Today" Food Editor
updated 9/28/2005 2:19:01 AM ET 2005-09-28T06:19:01

In this special weekly feature, “Today” food editor Phil Lempert brings you recipes “stolen” (with permission) from notable restaurants across America. See how much money you can save — and fun you can have — by cooking these dishes at home!

THIS WEEK: Macadamia Nut-Crusted Australian
Lamb Chops With Bordelaise Sauce, from The Sunburnt Cow in New York City

With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, today we start a series of recipes to help you plan the perfect dinner for your sweetheart.

We begin with a "down under" dish from the Australian-themed Sunburnt Cow in New York City, a year-old, loungey restaurant known for its witty and tasty cuisine. Macadamia Nut-Crusted Australian Lamb Chops is part of a special Valentine's menu.

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About the chef:
Heathe St. Clair born on the North Shore of Sydney to an English mother and an Australian father, which he describes as an ill-fated combination that almost prompted him to leave for England. Things improved, however, when his mother married an Australian of Italian decent who opened eateries throughout the Outback (and gave St. Clair his start in the restaurant business).

But the typical Aussie’s wandering heart took hold and St Clair eventually settled in New York City, where he has lived for the past 10 years. In 2003, he opened The Sunburnt Cow, which was named in honor of Bessie, his cow that passed during a 1972 heat wave in Alice Springs.

(PLEASE NOTE: Ingredient prices are estimates and based on national averages. Amounts listed are for one portion. Increase proportionately according to number of portions desired.)

Macadamia Nut-Crusted Australian Lamb Chops With Bordelaise Sauce
($10 on the menu at The Sunburnt Cow. Cook-at-home cost is $5.74.)

Recipe: Macadamia Nut-Crusted Australian Lamb Chops With Bordelaise Sauce (on this page)

The Sunburnt Cow
137 Avenue C
New York, NY 10009
212-529-0005
www.thesunburntcow.com

Want to find out how you can make your favorite restaurant dish at home? Just e-mail Phil at Phil.Lempert@nbc.com (or use the mail box below) with the name of the restaurant, city and state, and the dish you would like to have re-created. Want to know more about Phil and food? Visit his Web site at www.supermarketguru.com.

Want to find out how you can make your favorite restaurant dish at home? Just e-mail Phil at Phil.Lempert@nbc.com (or use the mail box below) with the name of the restaurant, city and state, and the dish you would like to have re-created. Want to know more about Phil and food? Visit his Web site at www.supermarketguru.com.

Recipe: Macadamia Nut-Crusted Australian Lamb Chops With Bordelaise Sauce

Jason Ahn
Ingredients
  • Bordelaise Sauce
  • 1/4 rack of Australian (or domestic) lamb chops ($2.85)
  • 1/4 cup macadamia nuts ($1.78)
  • 1/4 cup Panko bread crumbs ($0.06)
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil ($0.17)
  • 2 tablespoon full-grain Dijon mustard ($0.05)
  • Fresh-chopped parsley or chives (for garnish)
  • 1 tablespoon butter ($0.09)
  • 1 tablespoon flour ($0.02)
  • 2 teaspoons shallot, finely chopped ($0.05)
  • 2 teaspoons fresh parsley, chopped ($0.02)
  • 1 bay leaf ($0.03)
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme ($0.02)
  • Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup beef broth ($0.48)
  • 2 tablespoons dry red wine ($0.12)
Preparation

If possible, try to obtain Australian lamb chops for this dish. They are more juicy and succulent than American lamb chops and can be purchased on-line from several companies. If necessary, local lamb chops can be substituted. The Australian chops pair well with the sweet toasted macadamia nuts. Macadamia nuts are available in most supermarkets. They are indigenous to Australia, but now are heavily farmed in Hawaii.

Heat oven to 450 degrees. Macadamia nuts should be lightly toasted and chopped coarsely, then mixed with the bread crumbs, and set aside. (Panko bread crumbs are used in Japanese cooking and are available at many Asian food markets.)

Trim the meat completely away from the end of the rib, so that part of the bone is exposed. This process is called “frenching” the chop, and is already done on those chops that are ordered from specialty companies. Next, cut the ribs apart from each other to make individual chops. Season the chops with salt and pepper.

Heat oil in a medium sauté pan over high heat, then sear the chops on each side until brown. Do not cook chops past rare. Remove chops from pan and lightly coat with the grainy mustard.

Next, dust the chops with the bread crumb and macadamia mixture. Place chops on a rack, on a baking tray, and put into oven until coating is toasted to a golden brown. They should take approximately 6 minutes. Lamb chops should be cooked until medium rare. For well-done chops, decrease oven temperature and continue to cook for 5 to 6 minutes more.

Place chops on a bed of couscous. Spoon Bordelaise Sauce (see recipe below) over chops and garnish with fresh chopped parsley or chives.

Bordelaise Sauce
Melt butter in a heavy saucepan over low heat. Next, add flour and stir until smooth. Continue to stir while cooking for an additional minute. Stir in shallots and herbs, then gradually add broth and wine. Stir constantly while cooking over medium-high heat; until thickened. Remove bay leaf. Season with salt and pepper.

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