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Video: Dinner tonight: Simple spring seafood

  1. Transcript of: Dinner tonight: Simple spring seafood

    MORALES: And coming up next, we're making seafood a cinch with some easy tips for home chefs. But first, this is TODAY on NBC .

    SAVANNAH GUTHRIE, co-host: This morning on TODAY'S KITCHEN , EASY AS 1-2-3, simple spring seafood. Fish can be a little intimidating for the home cook, but chef Ed Brown of Ed 's Chowder House and the new Rittenhouse Tavern in Philadelphia has some secrets for success. Ed , good morning.

    Mr. ED BROWN: Good morning.

    GUTHRIE: We need your secrets. So we're making something with fluke. What -- how do you know you're getting fresh fish and why do you pick fluke?

    Mr. BROWN: First of all, fluke is a great firm white flesh and you're looking for nice firm. This is a whole one.

    GUTHRIE: Mm-hmm.

    Mr. BROWN: But if we see the fillets are just nice and wide and clean. You see the blood line and that it's nice and red indicates fresh.

    GUTHRIE: OK.

    Mr. BROWN: And I just sliced the fillets thinly.

    GUTHRIE: You slice on the bias. What does that mean?

    Mr. BROWN: I'm slicing on -- so on an angle.

    GUTHRIE: Mm-hmm.

    Mr. BROWN: On about a 45 degree angle, slicing them thin and just put them on the plate. This is any typical crudo dish like this, lots of good olive oil, plenty.

    GUTHRIE: Great. So this is served raw.

    Mr. BROWN: This is served raw.

    GUTHRIE: Yeah.

    Mr. BROWN: Some crispy Maldon sea salt , pink peppercorns...

    GUTHRIE: Mm-hmm.

    Mr. BROWN: ...some radishes for crunch and flavor...

    GUTHRIE: Yum.

    Mr. BROWN: ...and some color. I've got dill and chives.

    GUTHRIE: Wow. A little lemon zest .

    Mr. BROWN: A little lemon zest for that...

    GUTHRIE: Now, not all fish should be served raw, right? Certain...

    Mr. BROWN: Not all fish should be served raw.

    GUTHRIE: OK.

    Mr. BROWN: Fluke is a great one and it should be super quality.

    GUTHRIE: OK.

    Mr. BROWN: But that's real time. That's a simple dish.

    GUTHRIE: That's simple. Even -- hey, even I could do that, as long as I don't have to skin fish. Now this is a bluefish dish you're making.

    Mr. BROWN: It's a bluefish. And I 'm a Jersey boy and I love bluefish, and it's an underutilized fish. Which there's plenty around and underutilized because everybody thinks it's going to be strong in flavor.

    GUTHRIE: It doesn't get the respect it deserves.

    Mr. BROWN: It doesn't get the respect that it deserves. And in this case, we're just cooking it with some wine and lemon.

    GUTHRIE: Smells great.

    Mr. BROWN: Finishing it with some beans.

    GUTHRIE: Those are beans that you put in there. OK.

    Mr. BROWN: Beans that I split. Going to turn that on.

    GUTHRIE: How long do you keep the fish on there because the hard part is not overcooking?

    Mr. BROWN: Right.

    GUTHRIE: I find.

    Mr. BROWN: The fish only cook for about three and a half minutes total.

    GUTHRIE: All right. What's the sauce? How did you create that?

    Mr. BROWN: The sauce is just -- I have shallots in there with the beans.

    GUTHRIE: Yeah.

    Mr. BROWN: And wine and lemon.

    GUTHRIE: Woo.

    Mr. BROWN: Sorry.

    GUTHRIE: That's all right.

    Mr. BROWN: And this is...

    GUTHRIE: Yum.

    Mr. BROWN: This is a dish that we cook at Chowder House .

    GUTHRIE: OK. How long will that take start to finish?

    Mr. BROWN: Start to finish, that dish is about six minutes.

    GUTHRIE: All right. Now, what's this sauce we got going over here?

    Mr. BROWN: This is an oyster pan roast.

    GUTHRIE: Mm.

    Mr. BROWN: Oysters, cream, bacon, shallots, garlic.

    GUTHRIE: Oh. You're speaking my language.

    Mr. BROWN: This is...

    GUTHRIE: And your putting it over a crusty bread, it looks like.

    Mr. BROWN: Put it over crusty bread. We want to be soaking up all of that. And this is something that would be great -- we'll be serving at Rittenhouse Tavern .

    GUTHRIE: Tell us real quick about this dessert.

    Mr. BROWN: The dessert. This is a dessert that my wife, Kelly , invented. This is called Cracker Jack and Jack.

    TAMRON HALL reporting: What?

    Mr. BROWN: Vanilla ice cream...

    GUTHRIE: Yeah.

    Mr. BROWN: ...coated with cracker jacks ...

    NATALIE MORALES, anchor: Wow.

    Mr. BROWN: ...a caramel sauce made with Jack Daniel 's...

    GUTHRIE: Oh, my gosh.

    Mr. BROWN: ...and some sea salt ...

    MORALES: Wow.

    Mr. BROWN: ...in the caramel sauce. You eat it all together. This is a dish that actually we were enjoying some of those products one night.

    HALL: Yum.

    GUTHRIE: I was going to say.

    MORALES: Say, 'Wouldn't this be a great dessert?'

    HALL: We love your wife. Great idea.

    GUTHRIE: Were you sober when you created this?

    MORALES: Bring your wife by.

    Mr. BROWN: Next question.

    GUTHRIE: Yeah. All right. Chef Ed Brown . And we'll check out the new Rittenhouse in Philadelphia ...

    Mr. BROWN: Thank you.

    HALL: Coming...

    GUTHRIE: Thank you so much . Recipes on today.com.

TODAY recipes
updated 4/18/2012 6:59:14 PM ET 2012-04-18T22:59:14

As spring flowers bloom and the sun begins to warm, it can be fun and easy to whip up a satisfying seafood dinner at home. Here, Ed Brown, owner and chef of Ed's Chowder House in New York, shares three simple and delicious recipes — including a recipe for fluke crudo from the Rittenhouse Tavern, a new restaurant Brown is opening later this month in Philadelphia.

Recipe: Fluke crudo (on this page) Recipe: Shallow poached bluefish with spring beans (on this page) Recipe: Oyster pan roast (on this page)

© 2013 NBCNews

Recipe: Fluke crudo

Ingredients
  • 1 pound sashimi quality fluke fillets, skin off
  • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons crushed pink peppercorns
  • 6 each thinly shaved radishes (assorted OK; breakfast, candy cane, etc.)
  • 1/2 bunch chives, cut into 2-inch sticks
  • 1/4 bunch dill, pick small sprigs
  • Zest of 1 lemon, scraped on microplane
  • Maldon salt or fleur de sel
Preparation

Cut fish into thin slices on the bias, approximately 20 pieces. Arrange equally on 4 plates.

Dress with the oil and equally distribute remaining ingredients. Scrape all ingredients into plate.

Season well with the salt at the end.

Recipe: Shallow poached bluefish with spring beans

Ingredients
  • 3 each 2 1/2 to 3 pounds bluefish, gutted, filleted, skin off (6)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 each fresh shallots, peeled, diced
  • 1 cup white wine or water
  • 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2/3 pounds green beans (Snap root end, split centrally in quarters)
  • 1/2 pound yellow beans (Snap root end, split centrally in quarters)
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 bunch fresh chives, cut to 1-inch length
  • 1/2 bunch fresh tarragon, picked leaves, rough chopped
  • 1/2 bunch fresh chervil, rough chopped
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Preparation

In a large non-reactive skillet on medium heat, cook shallots in the oil.

Add the wine and lemon, bring to a simmer.

Place fish into liquid flesh-side down, keep a very gentle simmer, cook 1 1/2 minutes, flip carefully.

Cook approximately 3 minutes second side, remove to serving platter.

Add beans and butter to liquid and increase heat to medium high. Cook 1 minute.

Remove pan from the fire. Add herbs, sea salt and pepper. Adjust lemon juice if needed.

Equally distribute beans and sauce over the fish.

Recipe: Oyster pan roast

Ingredients
  • 20 each medium-sized oysters, shucked (Reserve juice separately)
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 2 each strips bacon, minced
  • 2 each small clove garlic, peeled, minced
  • 2 each fresh shallots, peeled, minced
  • 1 tablespoon vermouth
  • 1 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon Tabasco sauce
  • 1 teaspoon good brandy
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon rough chopped tarragon
  • 2 teaspoons rough chopped flat parsley
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 each 1-inch-thick baguette croutons (toasted crisp)
Preparation

In a medium sauce pan, heat oil on medium heat.

Add bacon and render fat, do not color.

Add shallots and garlic, sweat without color until translucent.

Add reserved oyster juice and vermouth, bring to a boil.

Add cream, Worcestershire and Tabasco, bring to boil, then simmer 1 minute.

Add oysters back, warm until edges curl.

Remove from fire. Add brandy, lemon, herbs and season.

In a soup bowl, place crouton on bottom, ladle oysters and sauce equally over the bread, serve.

Serving Size

Makes 4 appetizers.

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