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Video: Clinton says sharp ideology ‘lousy’ for economy

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    >> to that point, if unemployment does not come down significantly from 9.1%, you know the history, can this president be re-elected?

    >> yes, if people believe that he had a credible plan, and the republicans thwarted it, either because they were wrong or they just wanted to beat him. that's the problem they're facing. and i know there's a story in the press today saying that the house was going to offer to pass about 2.5% of what the president asked for. about 2.5%. if the story in the paper is right. and if that's true, they've put themselves in a perilous position. they are now opposing the payroll tax cuts that they have always been for. they had to figure out why they were against that. they're -- they're against them for wanting to offset the cost of this with raising taxes on upper-income people. if they don't want to do that now, they should say this is an emergency, and we'll just pass the tax cuts right now. it is an emergency. they didn't have any problem at all for 7 1/2 years fighting the wars in iraq and afghanistan off budget and doubling the debt of the country. and all of a sudden now, they can't bear to spend a little money to give the average american a payroll tax cut and the average small business person a payroll tax incentive to hire new people. i think that, you know, we need to clarify the choices here, and settle down. the fundamental problem, david, that's why i like what i'm doing now, in the global initiative, we have republicans and democrats, and conservatives and liberals and people from all over the world. we just try to do what works. and the fundamental problem that we've got in america today, i think, or parts of the economics, is that conflict makes good politics. sharp ideology and all this stuff, that's been very successful politically, but it's lousy for economic policymaking. if you look at the places that are really successful in america today, look at silicon valley , look at the computer simulation boom in orlando, and lots of other examples, in those places, without exception, you have cooperation between a vibrant private sector and a smart government. and cooperation is great for the economy, but it doesn't work as well politically. so we've got this big disconnect between politics and economics, and until we close it we're going to have a hard time coming back.

Photos: Living in the combat zone

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  1. U.S. infantry soldier Sgt. Michael Irwin relaxes on his bed at a Combat Operating Post Charkh in south Logar Province, Afghanistan, in September 2009. The post is southwest of Kabul, in a mostly rural area dotted by fruit orchards and corn fields. This group of soldiers was the first non-Afghan patrol force in this area. Irwin serves with the 3rd Platoon, Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. A pile of extra mattresses offers a recreational opportunity at COP Charkh. From left, Sgt. John Virgadamo, Spc. Matthew Ledford and Spc. Brian Lucey watch as Pvt. 2 Adam Ramsey takes the leap. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. From left, Sgt. Michael Irwin, Spc. Daniel Brand and Sgt. Daniel Hernandez shave and wash their faces at the post in Charkh. Infantry soldiers are generally young—most between 19 and 25--which helps them endure the grueling physical demands of the infantry. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. U.S. soldiers patrol in Logar Province. The troops spent most of their time patrolling on foot, walking three to five miles a day. They met with villagers and village officials to inquire about the community and to provide security or humanitarian assistance if needed. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. Spc. John Alamo returns fire at enemy combatants during a patrol in Logar Province. The troops avoid traveling in vehicles, which are more likely to hit roadside bombs. But traveling on foot makes them more susceptible to small-arms fire. Firefights are frequent when they patrol during the summer months. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. Spc. Justin Rottenberry sleeps in a secured area while on several day patrol from COP Charkh. The soldiers in the unit were based in Fort Drum in upstate New York but came from all over the country. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. Soldiers attend a mission briefing in the cafeteria at the Charkh post. The briefings happen most evenings, particularly before missions to plan for the next day. From left, Spc. Darren Stovall, Spc. Adlin Zukic, Pfc. Ryan Cooley, Spc. Devon Singleton, Spc. Justin Morris and Sgt. Daniel Hernandez. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. Pfc. Cody Marshall smokes a cigarette at the Combat Operating Post. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. Pfc. Ryan Cooley sits on a pile of water bottle supplies at the post in Charkh. Photojournalist Erin Trieb says the lives of soldiers on tour get stripped down to the essentials--eat, sleep, and survive. Staying hydrated during long patrols through dry, dusty mountains and hot valleys is a critical part of the survival equation. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. Soldiers take cover while an Afghan National Army soldier returns to the platoon with information, in the Tangi Valley, Wardack Province, Afghanistan, Sept. 2009. The U.S. soldiers on the left are from the 1st Platoon, Alpha Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. Staff Sgt. Cody Anderson rests after a patrol in the Tangi Valley, Wardack Province, Afghanistan. Anderson is part of the 1st Platoon, Alpha Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division. Sgt. Anderson had a difficult time when he returned home to America. He is the first soldier profiled in our video report on the challenges of post-traumatic stress disorder. Watch it here. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. Soldiers attend to Spc. James Rogers, who was injured when an IED detonated underneath his military vehicle in the Tangi Valley. The soldiers were from the 1st Platoon, Alpha Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. Soldiers open mail and care packages in their room at the post at Charkh. Because of the remoteness of the outpost, care packages took weeks to arrive. From left, Pvt. 2 Adam Ramsey, Spc. Aldin Zukic and Spc. Jason Vann of the 3rd Platoon, Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. A soldier looks at the Sports Illustrated magazine swimsuit issue at the post at Charkh. The magazine arrived in a care package; no pornography is allowed. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. Infantry soldiers Spc. Daniel Brand, center, and Spc. Darren Stovall, far right run toward a guard tower to return fire after the Combat Operating Post at Charkh was attacked. Brand was exercising in his physical training clothes at the time of the attack and didn't have time to change into uniform. The soldiers are from Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. Spc. Matthew Ledford rests after a firefight at the Charkh post. This company experienced some of the most intense fighting in the region. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  17. Spc. Aldin Zukic, left, and Pfc. Donald Garab roughhouse in their room in the post at Charkh. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  18. Sgt. Waylon Frederick (left), Sgt. Brian Cattaneo and Spc. Joseph Pohl play cards during down time at the Charkh combat post. The soldiers are from Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  19. Spc. Dirk Terpstra, left, and Sgt. Darren Stovall practice high kicks to pass the time at the Charkh combat post. They are part of Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division.

    Terpstra, who had experienced a personal trauma before enlisting in the military, committed suicide after his return home. In our video report on the difficulties some soldiers face when they return home, his mother Gail says: “He didn’t share. He didn’t open up.” (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  20. From left, Pvt. 2 Adam Ramsey, Pfc. Ryan Cooley, Spc. Jason Vann and Spc. Aldin Zukic pass the time by smoking cigarettes. They serve in 3rd Platoon, Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division. Photojournalist Erin Trieb noted: "These guys are with each other day in and day out, they really grow together .... The bond they forge when fighting together is unbreakable. They’re like brothers."

    During and after his tour in Afghanistan, Adam Ramsey experienced severe depression, leading him to attempt suicide. He describes his difficult return home in our video report . (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  21. Spc. Chris Conte of Bravo Company stands guard while on patrol in the south of Logar Province. He could hear gunfire in the distance of another platoon being fired upon and retaliating. The company had been on patrol since 2 a.m., so Conte was guarding an Afghan dwelling while his fellow troops were taking a rest. The soldiers detained a suspected insurgent that day. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  22. Staff Sgt. DeAndre Daniels investigates a vehicle blown up by an IED on a patrol in central Logar Province. The vehicle was hit by an IED 15 minutes earlier. A search for the person who detonated the bomb turned up nothing. It took 10 hours for the soldiers and photographer to be evacuated back to the outpost Daniels is part of 2nd Platoon, Alpha Battery, 4th Battalion, 25th Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
  23. Spc. Christopher Ostrander sits in an MRAP, wounded after an IED detonated under his vehicle while on patrol in central Logar Province. Initially, Ostrander's wound appeared slight -- a cut on the head. But he was taken by helicopter to a trauma center where it was discovered that his skull was cracked. He is with the 2nd Platoon, Alpha Company, 4th Battery, 25th Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division. (Erin Trieb / VII Mentor Program) Back to slideshow navigation
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