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Photos: Hurricane Irene

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  1. A house destroyed by Irene sits in a river in Rochester, Vt., on Wednesday, Aug. 31. Homeowner Jon Graham, right, removes items from the home with the help of friends. (Vyto Starinskas / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. Rescue crews in Paterson, N.J., patrol the intersection of Memorial Drive and Governor Road as the swollen Passaic River floods on Aug. 31. (Rich Schultz / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. Floodwaters from the Passaic River fill streets in Paterson, N.J., on Aug. 31. (Brendan Mcdermid / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. A volunteer removes mud and debris from a real estate office on Aug. 31 in Wilmington, Vt. The nearby Deerfield River overflowed its banks Sunday, inundating homes and businesses in the downtown area. (Matthew Cavanaugh / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. A woman looks out over a flooded street on Aug. 31 in Wallington, N.J. (Spencer Platt / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. Henry Rhines tries to salvage anything he can from the debris field that was once his home in Columbia, N.C., on Aug. 30. Several houses along U.S. 64 south of Columbia were destroyed when a tornado touched down before Hurricane Irene's wind and rain. Rhines wasn't home at the time, evacuating to Rocky Mount earlier in the day. "That tornado put a hurting on us right on down the line," he said. (Shawn Rocco / The News & Observer via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. Flooding in Rochester, Vt., eroded part of the town's cemetery, seen here on Aug. 30, exposing some coffins. (Toby Talbot / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. Residents of Totowa, N.J., are evacuated from their flooded homes on Aug. 30. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. Corrinne Levin kisses her daughter Jillianne Davis, whose home in Woodford, Vt., was destroyed by floodwaters. They were outside Davis' home on Aug. 30. (Matt Rourke / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. Keith Beavers examines his tobacco crop following Hurricane Irene in Mount Olive, N.C., on Aug. 30. Far from the beach towns that took Hurricane Irene's first hit, the storm inflicted some of its worst damage on inland farms from North Carolina to New York as crops were pummeled by wind, scalded by salt spray and submerged by floodwaters. Some farmers, like Beavers, are reporting total losses. (Jim R. Bounds / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. Jude Fitzgerald salvages items from a mud-filled basement in Brattleboro, Vt., on Aug. 30. (Jessica Hill / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. A bridge on Route 73 in Rochester, Vt., lies in the river on Aug. 30, cutting off road access to the town. (Toby Talbot / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. A man looks out at a closed and damaged beach on Aug. 30 in Westport, Conn. (Spencer Platt / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. Standing on a neighbor's porch in Stumpy Point, N.C., Darnel and Debbie Talbert lean on each other as Nationwide insurance agent Paul Tine checks on their policy on Aug. 30. The Talbert's house was heavily damaged by Hurricane Irene. (Shawn Rocco / The News & Observer via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. Irene-triggered floodwaters remain several feet deep in Wayne, N.J., on Aug. 30. New Jersey and Vermont continue to struggle with their worst flooding in decades. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. Residents wait in line outside a grocery store on Aug. 30 in Rochester, Vt. The town has been completely cut off since Irene hit. (Toby Talbot / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  17. This section of Highway 23 in Wayne, N.J., remains flooded on Aug. 30. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  18. Greg Austin of Avon, N.C., on Aug. 29 tries to save a large fish that was washed out of a local pond during the storm surge from Hurricane Irene. Avon is one of the Hatteras Island communities cut off due to breaches in N.C. Highway 12. (Chuck Liddy / The News & Observer via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  19. Flooding over a road from the Farmington River is seen in the aftermath of Irene in Simsbury, Conn., on Aug. 29. (Jessica Hill / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  20. Tom Chase waves atop of his friend's beach home in East Haven, Conn., on Aug. 29. (Jessica Hill / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  21. Firefighters from the Skyline Lakes Fire Department try to extinguish a fire fed by a natural gas line, which ruptured causing the house to explode, after the Pompton River overflowed its banks during a record flood, in Pompton Lake, N.J., on Aug. 29. (Chip East / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  22. This section of Route 7 south of Rutland, Vt., was washed out on Aug. 29. (Vyto Starinskas / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  23. Gino Borova gives a ride to his neighbor, Tom Soboleski, as they make their way through floodwaters after surveying their homes in Pompton Lakes, N.J., on Aug. 29. The Ramapo River flooded the area. (Julio Cortez / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  24. Sikorsky Memorial Airport in Strafford, Conn., saw storm damage from Irene, on Aug. 29. (Jessica Hill / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  25. Nan Raphael looks at damage to her block on Aug. 29 in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Washington D.C. (Jacquelyn Martin / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  26. Route 5 between Scotia to Schenectady, N.Y., is overrun by flood waters from the Mohawk River on Aug. 29. (Str / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  27. The top layer of blacktop on River Road lies peeled off due to AuSable River flooding in Lake Placid, N.Y., on Aug. 29. (Mike Lynch / Adirondack Daily Enterprise via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  28. Nina Brennan, right, and Phyllis Berry clean mud from the Proud Flower store in Waterbury, Vt., on Aug. 29. (Toby Talbot / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  29. Long Beach Lifeguard Patrol members clean rescue boards along the boardwalk at Long Beach, N.Y., on Aug. 29. (Craig Ruttle / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  30. Stranded travelers rest at LaGuardia Airport in New York on Aug. 29. The couple lying down is scheduled to take a flight to Dallas on Aug. 30. New York-area airports reopened on Aug. 29 as airlines gradually restored service after canceling more than 11,000 flights. (Don Emmert / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  31. Residents walk along Highway 12, the main road that connects Cape Hatteras National Seashore to the main land which was destroyed by Hurricane Irene in Rodanthe, N.C., on Aug. 28. (Jose Luis Magana / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  32. An unidentified male hangs on to a branch in a rain swollen creek as he waits for rescuers in New City, N.Y., on Aug. 28. He and three others went tubing in the creek and had to be rescued by New City and Stony Point fire departments' water rescue teams. (Peter Carr / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  33. Firefighters put out a fire at a rental house on Aug. 28 after it was destroyed by Irene at Cape Hatteras National Seashore in Rodanthe, N.C. (Jose Luis Magana / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  34. The raging Whetstone Brook surges over the falls in downtown Brattleboro, Vt., on Aug. 28. (Chris Bertelsen / The Brattleboro Reformer via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  35. A motorboat passes a submerged pickup truck on Main Street in Washingtonville, N.Y., on Aug. 28, following heavy rains from Irene. (Paul Kazdan / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  36. A Fairfield Beach Road home is submerged in Pine Creek in Fairfield, Conn., as treacherous weather caused by Irene came through the area on Aug. 28. (Cathy Zuraw / The Connecticut Post via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  37. Billy Stinson, left, comforts his daughter, Erin Stinson, as they sit on the steps where their cottage once stood before it was destroyed by Hurricane Irene in Nags Head, N.C., on Aug. 28. The cottage, built in 1903, was one of the first vacation cottages built on Albemarle Sound in Nags Head. Stinson has owned the home, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, since 1963. "We were pretending, just for a moment, that the cottage was still behind us and we were just sitting there watching the sunset," said Erin afterward. (Scott Olson / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  38. Bravo Company 1st of 120 out of Whiteville ride through rural Goose Creek Island handing out bags of ice on Aug. 28, in Lowland, N.C. Hurricane Irene made landfall in North Carolina, creating a storm surge of up to 8 feet in some areas of the Pamilco Sound. (Sara D. Davis / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  39. With the skyline of New York in the background, people fly a kite at the Erie-Lackawanna Park along Hudson River after the pass of Irene in Hoboken, N.J., on Aug 28. (Eduardo Munoz / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  40. A car sits submerged on Main Street in Hightstown, N.J., on Aug. 28, after Peddie Lake overflowed from Irene. Businesses and shops along the street were flooded. (Jim Gerberich / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  41. Crews from the New York Department of Environmental Protection work to unplug storm sewer grates on the Van Wyck Expressway under the Grand Central Parkway overpass in the Queens neighborhood of New York on Aug. 28. Widespread flooding of interstates and low-lying areas kept crews busy overnight and throughout the day. (Jonathan D. Woods / msnbc.com) Back to slideshow navigation
  42. Officials survey the damage to Route 12 on Hatteras Island, N.C., on Aug. 28. Hurricane Irene swept through the area Saturday, Aug. 27, cutting the roadway in five locations. (Steve Helber / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  43. A family inspects a downed tree in New York's Central Park after Irene dumped more than 6 inches of rain on Aug. 28. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  44. Ken Smith clears the street in front of his family's house after Irene hit the Rockaway beach section of Queens, N.Y., on Aug. 28. (Jessica Rinaldi / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  45. Mark Wade trips while surfing with his friend Craig Busick, left, in a large puddle in front of the Board of Education in Centreville, Md., on Aug. 28, after Irene. (Jim Watson / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  46. Danica Quinn, 9, and her dog Scruffy, stand in her front yard on C Street in Bridgeton, N.C., on Aug. 28. Quinn and her family were in their home during Hurricane Irene when winds toppled a pine tree that crashed through the roof of their living room. No one was hurt, though the house was destroyed. (Byron Holland / New Bern Sun Journal via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  47. Lechelle Spalding pulls a boat up to her flooded home after a storm surge on the Outer Banks in Kitty Hawk, N.C., on Aug. 28. (Charles Dharapak / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  48. Annie Gullett, right, gets help from her daughter Katy Caroline, center, and friend Louise Sanderlin sorting through damaged items in her gift shop after it was flooded in the wake of Hurricane Irene on Aug. 28 in Manteo, N.C. (Scott Olson / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  49. Darrell Tarte, a property estimator with Erie Insurance, surveys damage from a tree at a home in Port Republic, Md., on Aug. 28. (Steve Ruark / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  50. Two Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority trains sit in water on flooded tracks on Aug. 28 in Trenton, N.J. Rains from Irene caused inland flooding of rivers and streams. (Mel Evans / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  51. Rainwater collects beneath machinery at the World Trade Center site on Aug. 28 in New York. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  52. High winds from Irene knocked down five large trees in front of the East River Cooperative Village apartment buildings along Grand Avenue on Aug. 28 in New York City. (Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  53. Waves and storm surge pound the boardwalk and the beach at first light as Irene slams into Asbury Park, N.J., on Aug. 28. (Chip East / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  54. Brian Grant, left, and Bob Bianchini, engineers from the public works department out for a safety inspection, are slammed by waves and storm surge pounding the boardwalk and the beach at Asbury Park, N.J., on Aug. 28. (Chip East / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  55. Sand covers the boardwalk after Irene passed through in Ocean City, Md., on Aug. 28. (Molly Riley / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  56. Chris Swimm retrieves planks from a friend's deck washed away by waves from Irene that surged onto Wilbur's Point in Fairhaven, Mass., on Aug. 28. (Peter Pereira / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  57. Waves kicked up by Irene crash into homes on Wilbur's Point in Fairhaven, Mass., on Aug. 28. (Peter Pereira / The Standard Times via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  58. Josh Holloway, son of homeowner Jack Holloway, stands near the front door as family members look over the damage to their home in Lewis, Del., on Aug. 28. (Suchat Pederson / The News Journal via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  59. Hurricane Irene's wind and rain pour down as North Cove Marina employees work to secure gangways, docks and boats as seawater comes over the marina's low walls just before high tide in the World Financial Center Plaza on Aug. 28 in New York City. (Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  60. Pat Valent helps friends clear out belongings from their storm-damaged beach home in the Sandbridge area of Virginia Beach, Va. on Aug. 28. Irene caused damage over such a broad area that the total damage is not yet known. (Steve Helber / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  61. A woman walks by downed trees in Brooklyn during heavy rain and winds from Hurricane Irene on Aug. 28 in New York City. While Hurricane Irene has now been downgraded to a tropical storm, it has knocked out power to more than 3 million people. (Spencer Platt / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  62. A lighthouse-shaped building is battered by storm surge and winds from Hurricane Irene in Montauk, New York on Aug. 28. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  63. A man walks on a flooded street in Hoboken, N.J. on Aug. 28. (Kena Betancur / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  64. Jeremy Wilkins of the Kitty Hawk Fire Department removes a tree that was downed by Hurricane Irene on the Outer Banks in Kitty Hawk, N.C., on Aug. 28, (Charles Dharapak / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  65. Rising water laps over the sea wall at Battery Park in New York City on Aug. 28. Hurricane Irene bore down on a dark and quiet New York early Sunday, bringing winds and rapidly rising seawater that threatened parts of the city. (Mary Altaffer / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  66. A bull dozer clears sand and debris from Hwy. 12 near Avon, N.C. on Aug. 28. High winds from hurricane Irene and overnight flooding affected much of the Outer Banks. (Steve Early / The Virginia-Pilot via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  67. The Coney Island boardwalk in New York is obscured by sand and rain as Hurricane Irene reached the area on Aug. 28. Rainfall overflowed sewers and seawater lapped at sidewalks at the edges of New York City from densely populated lower Manhattan to the far reaches of Queens as a weakening Irene made landfall over Coney Island. (Craig Ruttle / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  68. A street signs rest in a Baltimore, Md. street, Aug. 28, after falling over during Hurricane Irene. The storm caused some power outages but no significant damage or flooding throughout the Baltimore region. (Patrick Smith / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  69. Manhattan is hit by Hurricane Irene on Sunday, Aug. 28. The hurricane hit New York City’s skyscrapers with fierce winds and threatened to flood the financial district after killing ten people along the East coast on Saturday. (Emmanuel Dunand / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  70. IKONOS satellite images show before, Dec. 27, 2010, and after, Aug. 28, 2011, views of an area north of Rodanthe, North Carolina following Hurricane Irene. The after view shows broken sections of Highway 12 caused by the hurricane. (Geoeye / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  71. Heavy rain falls in Battery Park in New York City as Hurricane Irene hits Manhattan on Aug. 28. Battery Park and other areas in Lower Manhattan were evacuated in advance of the storm. (Jason Decrow / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  72. People walk in Times Square in New York on Aug. 28, as Hurricane Irene hits the city and Tri State area with rain and high winds. (Timothy A. Clary / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  73. A gas station is damaged on Aug. 28 after Hurricane Irene swept through Lusby, Md. (Steve Ruark / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  74. Waves crash onto a road as Hurricane Irene arrives, Aug. 28, in Southampton, New York. Irene is expected to move through the area today with heavy rain and high winds. (Joe Raedle / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  75. Floodwater surrounds a home as Hurricane Irene arrives on Aug. 28 in Southampton, New York. Irene is expected to move through the area today with heavy rain and high winds. (Joe Raedle / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  76. Branches litter an alley in Virginia Beach, VA on Sunday, Aug. 28. The hurricane made landfall in North Carolina and Virginia early Saturday morning and has now moved further up the East coast to New Jersey and New York later today. (Brendan Hoffman / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  77. A man walks past a damaged store front on a boardwalk in Ocean City, Md., on Aug. 28. Authorities in Ocean City said that there were no reports of major damage. (Patrick Semansky / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  78. The sun rises over the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, Va. on Aug. 28. Hurricane Irene made landfall in North Carolina and Virginia early Saturday morning and has now moved further up the East coast. (Brendan Hoffman / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  79. Large waves from Hurricane Irene pound the Ocean City pier on Aug. 28 in Ocean City, Md. During the night Hurricane Irene past by the small resort town causing power outages, minimal flood and wind damage. (Mark Wilson / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  80. Two men explore a street flooded by Hurricane Irene on Aug. 27 in Manteo, N.C. (John Bazemore / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  81. This road in Virginia Beach, Va., flooded on Aug. 27. (Steve Helber / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  82. A water rescue team maneuvers around a beached boat in the middle of Hwy. 304 in Mesic, N.C., on Aug. 27. (Chris Seward / The News & Observer via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  83. Floodwaters surround homes on Hwy 304 in Mesic, N.C., on Aug. 27. (Chris Seward / The News & Observer via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  84. Jackie Sparnackel has to abandon her van and her belongings after she ventured to check out the storm-damaged pier in Frisco, N.C., on Aug. 27. (Chuck Liddy / The News & Observer via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  85. Firefighters work to remove the body of an 11-year-old killed when a tree fell and severely damaged this home in Newport News, Va., on Aug. 27. (Rob Ostermaier / Newport News Daily Press / MCT via Zuma Press) Back to slideshow navigation
  86. The hurricane-force winds of Irene rip the siding off of homes in Nags Head, N.C., on Aug. 27. (Stephen M. Katz / The Virginian-Pilot via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  87. Jarod Wilton looks at the floodwaters rising to his doorstep on Aug. 27, in Alliance, N.C., as Hurricane Irene hits the coast. (Chuck Burton / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  88. Kelly Harvey, who evacuated her St. Leonard, Md., home, plays with her daughter on Aug. 27 at a hurricane shelter set up at Southern Middle School in Lusby, Md. (Steve Ruark / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  89. Lounge chairs are stored in a pool in Ocean City, Md., on Aug. 27 in order to keep them from blowing away. (Molly Riley / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  90. Two men push a cart through an otherwise deserted Grand Central Terminal in New York on Aug. 27. Metro North has suspended service and Amtrak is running on a reduced schedule due to Hurricane Irene. (Marjorie Anders / NY Metropolitan Transportation Authority via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  91. Sandbags are stacked outside a Manhattan financial district building on Aug. 27 in New York. (John Minchillo / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  92. The Berkeley Mall in Goldsboro, N.C., saw a roof collapse in its atrium section on Aug. 27. (Michael K. Dakota / The Goldsboro News-Argus via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  93. The victim of a fatal car accident near Interstate 795 in Goldsboro, N.C., is recovered by crews on Aug. 27. The two-car accident occurred at an intersection where traffic signals were not working due to a power outage caused by Irene. (Robert Willett / The News & Observer via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  94. People shield themselves from blowing sand and rain as they look over the beach during Hurricane Irene on Aug. 27 in Kill Devil Hills, N.C. (Scott Olson / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  95. Damaged power lines burn in Nags Head, N.C., on Aug. 27, as Hurricane Irene hits the northern Outer Banks of North Carolina. (Nicholas Kamm / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  96. Cody Levy, left, Ian Crossman, and Christian Van Vliet run out onto a receded Albemarle Sound in Kill Devil Hills, N.C., on Aug. 27. The sound had moved out due to the high winds of Hurricane Irene. (Shawn Rocco / Zuma Press) Back to slideshow navigation
  97. Vehicles are driven through a flooded area during Hurricane Irene in Surf City, N.C., on Aug. 27. (Randall Hill / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  98. People hurry in the rain on the boardwalk as Hurricane Irene bears down on Cape May, N.J., on Aug. 27. (Mel Evans / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  99. Turnstiles are barricaded with caution tape shortly before the New York City Subway system suspended service for the first time ever, as preparations are made for Hurricane Irene, in New York, on Aug. 27. (Mike Groll / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  100. A worker places plywood on the windows of a home as he and other workers secure it against the winds of Hurricane Irene on Aug. 27, in Water Mill, N.Y. (Joe Raedle / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  101. One of two people rescued from a sailboat uses a line to make their way onto the beach on Willoughby Spit in Norfolk, Va., on Aug. 27. The two were rescued from the boat that foundered in the waters of the Chesapeake Bay. A rescuer, left, waits for s second person to exit the boat. (Bill Tiernan / The Virginian-Pilot via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  102. An onlooker takes a photo of a fallen gas canopy hit by Hurricane Irene, at the Atlantic Food Mart in Surf City, N.C., on Aug. 27. (Randall Hill / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  103. A man fills sand bags at 128th Street beach in the Rockaways, N.Y., on Aug. 27, in preparation for Hurricane Irene. (Spencer Platt / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  104. Police walk through an area which is under mandatory evacuation orders in the Rockaways, N.Y., on Aug. 27, in preparation for Hurricane Irene. (Spencer Platt / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  105. Arseni Flax, center, and his mother Nelly wait for their subway train to leave as they bring along their parakeets while evacuating the Coney Island section of New York, on Aug. 27. (Craig Ruttle / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  106. Margene Jezo of Kitty Hawk goes for a 6-mile jog as Hurricane Irene lashes the Outer Banks in Kitty Hawk, N.C, on Aug. 27. (Jim Lo Scalzo / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  107. Don Hurtig looks at an oak tree that blew over in his front yard as Hurricane Irene comes ashore near Morehead City, N.C., on Aug. 27. (Steve Nesius / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  108. Defying mandatory evacuation orders and a curfew, summer residents Pam Cooke, left, and Jody Bowers share a laugh as strong winds puff up Jody's jacket as they venture out to the beach in Kill Devil Hills, N.C., on Aug. 27. (Charles Dharapak / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  109. People shop at a Hurricane Irene fashion sale in the town of Amagansett, N.Y. on the east end of Long Island, on Aug. 27. (Peter Foley / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  110. Lifeguard Steve Thompson patrols the beach on Aug. 27, in Montauk, N.Y., as Hurricane Irene approaches. (Stephen Chernin / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  111. The sun breaks through as surfers hit the ocean on Aug. 27, off of Pawleys Island, S.C. after Hurricane Irene moved through the area and north along the eastern Atlantic coast. (Steve Jessmore / The Sun-News via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  112. Water in a parking lot enters a storm drain as winds and high tides from approaching Hurricane Irene start to hit the area, on Aug. 27, in Ocean City, Md. (Mark Wilson / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  113. Debbie Austin gets off her boat as winds and high tides from approaching Hurricane Irene start to hit the area, on Aug. 27, in Ocean City, Md. (Mark Wilson / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  114. Personnel at the National Hurricane Center in Miami, including NHC director Bill Read, center bottom, conduct a conference call to coordinate the 11 a.m. ET forecast for Hurricane Irene, on Aug. 27. (Andy Newman / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  115. Abandoned beachfront houses are surrounded by rising water from Hurricane Irene in Nags Head, N.C., on Aug. 27. (Gerry Broome / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  116. A pedestrian crosses an open area as Hurricane Irene passes through Wrightsville Beach, N.C., on Aug. 27. (Randall Hill / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  117. Roman Alvarez, left, and Bob Alvarez use plywood to secure a business against the winds of Hurricane Irene on Aug. 27, in Southhampton, N.Y. (Joe Raedle / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  118. Rhiannon Shaw, 9, tries to stay warm while checking out the beach with friends as Hurricane Irene passes through Wrightsville Beach, N.C., on Aug. 27. (Randall Hill / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  119. Waves crash into Avalon Pier as Hurricane Irene strikes the Outer Banks in Kill Devil Hills, N.C., on Aug. 27. (Jim Lo Scalzo / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  120. Pawleys Island police closed the North Causeway to Pawleys Island as the marshes filled with water at high tide, forming white caps and began crossing the road on Aug. 26 in Pawleys Island, S.C. (Steve Jessmore / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  121. Milk refrigerators sit almost empty at a Target store as New Yorkers stock up on supplies in preparation for Hurricane Irene in Queens, New York on Aug. 26. (Andrew Gombert / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  122. Traffic backs up at The Washout at Folly Beach as people come out to watch the waves created by Hurricane Irene and cheer on the few surfers that came out on Aug. 26 in Folly Beach, S.C. (Sarah Bates / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  123. Boaters brave the waves and wind caused by Hurricane Irene at the Morris Island light house on Aug. 26 in Folly Beach, S.C. (Sarah Bates / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  124. People crowd a Whole Foods store in Manhattan before the arrival of Hurricane Irene in New York City on Aug. 26. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  125. Heading out before Hurricane Irene arrives, people line up on Aug. 26, for a ferry leaving the island of Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts. (Cj Gunther / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  126. People crowd an outdoor supply store in New York City on Aug. 26. The store had already sold out of batteries and flashlights. (Mario Tama / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  127. Cars pack the westbound lanes of the Atlantic City Expressway on Aug. 26, as thousands of people evacuate the barrier islands along the southern New Jersey coastline ahead of Hurricane Irene. (Tom Mihalek / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  128. An 83-year-old gets help finding a taxi in New York City on Aug. 26 after she and some 400 others were discharged or moved from a hospital in a low-lying area due to Irene. (Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  129. Travellers wait in line for Metro North tickets at New York's Grand Central Station on Aug. 26. (Brendan Mcdermid / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  130. Beachgoers walk against the wind as Hurricane Irene begins to pound Atlantic Beach, N.C., on Aug. 26. (Steve Nesius / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  131. A worker boards up a "Ripleys Believe it or Not!" located on the boardwalk in Ocean City, Md., on Aug. 26. (Mark Wilson / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  132. Nursing home residents are evacuated in Barco, N.C., on Aug. 26. (Jim R. Bounds / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  133. Traffic northbound on Garden State Parkway near Ocean View, N.J., was backed up on Aug. 26. (Mel Evans / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  134. A shopper passes by empty shelves while looking for bottled water at a store at Rockaway Beach in New York on Aug. 26. (Allison Joyce / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  135. Ambulances wait to transfer patients out of Coney Island Hospital as evacuations began in low-lying parts of New York on Aug. 26. (Timothy A. Clary / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  136. A surfboard provides protection from wind gusts of 50 mph on Folly Beach, S.C., on Aug. 26. (Richard Ellis / Getty Images Contributor) Back to slideshow navigation
  137. Customers stand in line outside a Home Depot in Springfield, N.J., on Aug. 26. More than 50 people put their names on a wait list for a rumored shipment of generators. (John Makely / msnbc.com) Back to slideshow navigation
  138. A lifeguard stand is removed along a beach in Atlantic City, N.J., on Aug. 25, ahead of Hurricane Irene. (Danny Drake / The Press of Atlantic City via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  139. A message is left for Hurricane Irene on one house, as a resident boards up another on Aug. 25 in Nags Head, N.C. (Charles Dharapak / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  140. A high hazard warning flag for dangerous rip currents is raised on Aug. 25 at Tybee Island, Ga. (Stephen Morton / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  141. Ismael Ramirez, right, fastens a plywood board to a house an Ortley Beach, N.J., while his brother Jorge Ramirez measures the next board. The handymen are boarding up the house for a New Jersey Shore resident in preparation for Hurricane Irene on Aug. 25. Gov. Chris Christie asked New Jersey shore visitors to get out by midday Friday because the hurricane is poised to be a "serious, significant event" with possible flooding across the entire state. (Julio Cortez / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  142. Cory Ritz braces himself as a wave bursts onto a pier on Aug. 25 in Boynton Beach, Fla. Irene caused high surf along the Florida coast. (Joe Raedle / Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  143. Workers at Alligator River Growers harvest corn in Engelhard, N.C., on Aug. 25, in advance of Hurricane Irene as it threatens to make landfall in North Carolina. The storm's winds and torrential rains could mean devastating losses for those who grow corn, cotton, soybeans, tobacco and timber. (Gerry Broome / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  144. Shoppers stock up on water from rapidly emptying shelves at a grocery store in Far Rockaway in New York on Aug. 25. Mayor Michael Bloomberg urged New York City residents living in low-lying areas to line up a place to stay on high ground ahead of a possible evacuation this weekend. (Seth Wenig / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  145. Winds from Hurricane Irene whip through Nassau, Bahamas, on Aug. 25. The center of the storm stayed offshore but still downed trees and caused power outages. (Lynne Sladkybahma / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  146. Heeding the mandatory visitor evacuation, the Wyn family of Cleona, Pa., pack up at their rented beach house in Nags Head, N.C., on Aug. 25. (Charles Dharapak / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  147. Tugboats help Navy guided missile destroyers, the Jason Dunham, left, and the the Winston Churchill, leave the Norfolk Naval Station on Aug. 25. as Hurricane Irene approaches. The U.S. Navy ordered more than 60 ships out to safer waters so they could better weather the storm. (Bill Tiernan / The Virginian Pilot via AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  148. Trees downed by Hurricane Irene block a road in Nassau, Bahamas, on Aug. 25. (Lynne Sladky / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  149. Residents of San Cristobal, Dominican Republic, on Aug. 24 look at damage left by Irene along the Nigua River. At least three people were killed and more than 37.000 people were evacuated in the country due to the heavy rains caused by the hurricane earlier in the week. (Orlando Barría / EPA) Back to slideshow navigation
  150. Residents search for belongings amid debris in San Cristobal, Dominican Republic, on Aug. 24. (Roberto Guzman / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
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  1. Image: Homeowner Jon Graham removes items from his demolished home
    Vyto Starinskas / AP
    Above: Slideshow (150) Hurricane Irene
  2. Daryl Cagle / MSNBC.com, Politicalcartoons.com
    Slideshow (11) Cartoonists poke at Irene
  3. Eric Gay / AP
    Slideshow (29) Hurricane havoc
NBC, msnbc.com and news services
updated 8/28/2011 7:32:53 AM ET 2011-08-28T11:32:53

Top developments:

  • Falling trees, rough surf blamed for deaths
  • Storm makes second landfall in New Jersey
  • Power failures leave 2 million in dark
  • Tornado reported in Md., Va., and Del.
  • Tornado warnings issued for New York City and Philadelphia
  • More than 9,000 flights canceled through Monday
  • About 2.5 million ordered to evacuate along East Coast.

Barely a hurricane Sunday but massive and packed with rain, Irene flooded towns, killed 10 people and knocked out power to more than 2 million homes and businesses as it plodded up the East Coast, saving the strongest winds it had left for New York.

The storm made a second landfall near Little Egg Inlet, New Jersey, at around 5:30 a.m. Sunday, with winds an estimated at 75 mph.

All told, about 2.5 million people have been ordered to leave up and down the East Coast. Irene had an enormous wingspan — 500 miles wide — and threatened 65 million people in the region, estimated at largest number of Americans ever affected by a single storm.

The streets of the nation's largest city were eerily quiet Sunday morning, its transit system shut down because of weather for the first time in history. Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned late Saturday that no matter whether residents of low-lying areas heeded his calls to evacuate, "The time for evacuation is over. Everyone should now go inside and stay inside."

The storm hugged the U.S. coastline on a path that could scrape every state along the coast. By Sunday morning, it had sustained winds of 75 mph, down from 100 mph on Friday. That made it a Category 1, the least threatening on a 1-to-5 scale, and barely stronger than a tropical storm. Nevertheless, it was still considered highly dangerous, capable of causing ruinous flooding with a combination of storm surge, high tides and 6 to 12 inches of rain.

Video: Flooding damages historic boardwalk (on this page)

Tornadoes were reported in Maryland and Delaware, and several warnings were issued elsewhere, including New York and Philadelphia.

Irene caused flooding from North Carolina to Delaware, both from the seven-foot waves it pushed into the coast and from heavy rain. Eastern North Carolina got 10 to 14 inches of rain, according to the National Weather Service. Virginia's Hampton Roads area was drenched with at least nine inches, with 16 reported in some spots.

More than 1 million homes and businesses lost power in Virginia alone, where three people were killed by falling trees, at least one tornado touched down and about 100 roads were closed. Emergency crews around the region prepared to head out at daybreak to assess the damage, though with some roads impassable and rivers still rising, it could take days.

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Some held out optimism that their communities had suffered less damage than they had feared.

"I think it's a little strong to say we dodged a bullet. However, it certainly could have turned out worse for the Hampton Roads area [of Virginia]," said National Weather Service meteorologist Mike Montefusco.

Officials warned residents to remain inside.

"Everything is still in effect," National Hurricane Center spokesman Dennis Feltgen said. "The last thing people should do is go outside. They need to get inside and stay in a safe place until this thing is over."

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Ed Rappaport, deputy director of the National Hurricane Center in Florida, said the storm is so large that areas far from Irene's center are going to be feeling strong winds and getting large amounts of rain, he said.

"It is a big, windy, rainy event," he said.

Video: Social media key to storm communications (on this page)

Irene was the first hurricane to make landfall in the continental United States since 2008, and came almost six years to the day after Katrina ravaged New Orleans on Aug. 29, 2005. Experts said that probably no other hurricane in American history had threatened as many people.

Airlines said 9,000 flights were canceled, including 3,000 on Saturday. The number of passengers affected could easily be millions because so many flights make connections on the East Coast.

Greyhound suspended bus service between Richmond, Va., and Boston. Amtrak canceled trains in the Northeast for Sunday.

Storm wields death
Storm-toppled trees, roiled surf and other effects left left at least 10 people dead by Saturday night as Irene passed, according to local officials.

In Virginia, falling trees were blamed for the deaths of a man in his 60s at his Chesterfield County house, a car passenger in Brunswick County, and a boy in a Newport News apartment. A falling tree in Maryland killed one person in a Queen Anne's County house.

In North Carolina, a girl died in a wreck after the car she was in crashed at an intersection where Irene had knocked out power to the traffic lights. One person died in a vehicle crash in Pitt County; a man died after a branch fell on him in Nash County; and a man died of a heart attack in Onslow County as he was boarding up his home.

In Florida, a surfer was killed in 10-foot waves at New Smyrna Beach while in New Jersey, a man drowned in 4-foot surf in Flagler County.

Irene-spawned tornadoes struck the Maryland, Delaware, Virginia peninsula known as DelMarVa.

A tornado that ripped through the Sandbridge area of Virginia Beach destroyed five homes and damaged several others. A tornado touched down near Lewes, Del., and damaged 15 buildings, the National Weather Service said. Maryland Police also said they spotted a tornado in a wooded area of the lower eastern shore.

Irene's impact varied by region and state.

New York, New England
As the storm's outer bands reached New York Saturday night, two kayakers capsized and had to be rescued off Staten Island. They received summonses and a dressing-down from Bloomberg, who said at a press conference that they recklessly put rescuers' lives at risk.

Tornado warnings were issued for the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens early Sunday.

In New York, authorities undertook the herculean job of bringing the city to a halt. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority shut down its subways, trains and buses for a natural disaster for the first time, a job that began at noon Saturday and took into late that night to complete.

On Wall Street, sandbags were placed around subway grates near the East River because of fear of flooding. Tarps were spread over other grates. Construction stopped throughout the city, and workers at the site of the World Trade Center dismantled a crane and secured equipment.

PhotoBlog: Eye of the storm

New York has seen only a few hurricanes in the past 200 years. The Northeast is much more used to snowstorms — including a blizzard last December, when Bloomberg was criticized for a slow response.

Boston's transit authority said all bus, subway and commuter rail service would be suspended all day Sunday.

New Jersey
The hurricane made secondary landfall at Little Eeg Inlet in New Jersey with 75-mph winds at around 5:30 a.m. ET Sunday, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Roads in coastal areas grew impassable Saturday night and New Jersey State Police urged people to stay off them. Middlesex County and a number of cities and towns, including Jersey City, declared states of emergency and banned all traffic except for emergency vehicles.

  1. Live Irene video
    1. NBC Washington
    2. NBC New York
    3. NBC Philadelphia
    4. NBC Connecticut

More than 1 million people were told to evacuate Cape May County, coastal Atlantic County and Long Beach Island, N.J. Gov. Chris Christie said.

At a news briefing Christie said that he remained concerned because some residents of Atlantic City, particularly senior citizens, were refusing to leave, even though "we are most certainly going to suffer property and structural damage."

New Jersey Transit trains and buses shut down Saturday, as did Atlantic City casinos for only the third time since gambling was legalized 33 years ago.

Exelon Corp. said it took its Oyster Creek nuclear power plant in New Jersey offline as a precautionary measure at 5 p.m. ET. The reactor has a 636 megawatt capacity, enough power for 600,000 homes. .

Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett warned that the state will not necessarily be out of danger once the storm has passed: "The rivers may not crest until Tuesday or Wednesday. This isn't just a 24-hour event."

Annette Burton, 72, was asked to leave her Chester, Pa., neighborhood because of danger of rising water from a nearby creek. She said she planned to remain in the row house along with her daughter and adult grandson, although with a wary eye on the park across the street that routinely floods during heavy rains.

"I'm not a fool; if it starts coming up from the park, I'm leaving," she said. "It's the wind I'm more concerned about than anything."

In Philadelphia, Mayor Michael Nutter declared a state of emergency, the first for the city since 1986, when racial tensions were running high. "We are trying to save lives and don't have time for silliness," he said.

Delaware
Early on Sunday, President Barack Obama declared an emergency situation in Delaware and ordered federal aid to supplement state and local response efforts.

Areas around the Delaware River in and around Wilmington were being evacuated because of expected floods, George Giles, director of the Wilmington Department of Emergency Management, told MSNBC-TV.

Video: President Obama briefed on Hurricane Irene

The Indian River Inlet Bridge was closed Saturday afternoon to all but emergency traffic and the governor banned non-essential travel in the state.

Kent General Hospital in Dover was flooded and crews were pumping water to save its electrical system.

Maryland
A nuclear reactor at Maryland's Calvert Cliffs went offline automatically when winds knocked off a large piece of aluminum siding that came into contact with the facility's main transformer late Saturday night. An "unusual event" was declared, the lowest of four emergency classifications by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, but Constellation Energy Nuclear Group spokesman Mark Sullivan said the facility and all employees were safe.

Near Callway, Md., about 30 families were warned that a dam could spill over, causing significant flooding, and that they should either leave their homes or stay upstairs. St. Mary's County spokeswoman Sue Sabo said the dam was not in danger of breaching.

Interactive: Hurricane Tracker (on this page)

Gov. Martin O'Malley said he was hopeful that forecasts are correct in calling for a Chesapeake Bay tidal surge of no greater than 3 feet.

More than 5,000 residents were in 20 shelters set up by the state, O'Malley said.

Winds were expected to create a reverse tide, pulling water out of places like Annapolis and Baltimore, which had a larger than expected surge during Tropical Storm Isabel.

St. Mary's County issued a potential St. Mary's Lake Dam failure notification after more than 7 inches of rain fell, NBC Washington reported. People downstream of the dam were in danger of flooding.

Falling trees pulled down power lines and fell into homes.

National Weather Service warned of flooding in parts of southern and central Maryland and the Eastern Shore, with up to 8 inches of rain on lower Eastern Shore.

The Maryland Transit Administration suspended service Saturday evening.

Virginia and Washington, D.C.
The storm arrived in Washington just days after an earthquake damaged some of the capital's most famous structures, including the Washington Monument. Irene could test Washington's ability to protect its national treasures and its poor.

Early on Sunday, Obama declared an emergency situation in the District of Columbia and ordered federal aid to supplement state and local response efforts.

Heavy wind and rain were pounded the nation's capital Saturday night, NBC Washington reported. About 20,000 people were without power in the Washington area, only a few of them in the city itself, where sandbags were no longer available.

A roof of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Georgetown University partially collapsed.

Wind and rain pummeled the Virginia coast, and flooding was expected. Rain in the capital was falling about a half-inch per hour around midnight Saturday night, with the worst yet to hit.

The Norfolk Naval Air Station was enduring rain with wind of 59 mph at 7 p.m. ET, according to the National Weather Service. By 11 p.m., winds were to 54 mph.

Readers capture Hurricane Irene's approach

Falling trees hit houses and blocked streets in Fairfax County, Va., where street flooding was also reported.

The heavy rain blanketing the region was overflowing many creeks and streams, closing many area roads, including Sligo Creek Parkway, Beach Drive, Little Falls Parkway, NBC Washington reported. Residents at Four Mile Run and Cameron Run were warned to watch for high water.

North Carolina
In North Carolina, where at least two people were killed, Gov. Beverly Perdue said Irene inflicted significant damage along the North Carolina coast and some areas were unreachable.

"Folks are cut off in parts of North Carolina, and obviously we're not going to get anybody to do an assessment until it's safe," she said.

Irene made its official landfall just after first light near Cape Lookout, N.C., at the southern end of the Outer Banks, the ribbon of land that bows out into the Atlantic Ocean. Shorefront hotels and houses were lashed with waves, two piers were destroyed and at least one hospital was forced to run on generator power.

Eastern North Carolina got 10 inches to 14 inches of rain, according to the National Weather Service.

Also contributing to this report: Bob Sullivan of msnbc.com; Greg Forbes and Bryan Norcross of The Weather Channel; Rosanne Arlia, Tom Costello, Courtney Kube, Brian LePore, Luke Russert, Kerry Sanders, Mike Viqueira, Norma Rubio and Anna Tuman of NBC News; and NBC stations WAVY of Newport News, Va., WCAU of Philadelphia, WECT of Wilmington, N.C., WESH of Orlando, Fla., WHDH of Boston, WNCN of Raleigh, N.C.; WRC of Washington, WITN of Washington, N.C., and WVIT of Hartford, Conn.

Video: Flooding damages historic boardwalk

Interactive: Hurricane Tracker

See current storm data and paths of earlier storms from this season.

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