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Image: Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart
Andrew Cooper  /  Summit Entertainment
Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart in "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 1."
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updated 8/19/2011 4:07:57 PM ET 2011-08-19T20:07:57

Team Jacob or Team Edward?

If you've got an answer, then you're a perfect target for a new "Twilight"-themed Facebook scam currently spreading around the massive, and massively exploitable, social network.

Detected by researchers from the security firm Trend Micro, this new scam promises free tickets to see "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 2."

Sounds great, right? Who wouldn't want free tickets to a wildly anticipated movie?

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There are two catches to this otherwise great offer. The first, of course, is that "Breaking Dawn, Part 2" isn't scheduled to hit big screens until Nov. 12, 2012, well after the Nov. 18, 2011 release of "Part 1."

If that doesn’t raise a red flag, and you find yourself driven uncontrollably — like, say a vampire — to score these free movie tickets and see how the passionate relationship between Bella, Edward and Jacob ends — well, you're out of luck.

Like past movie ticket scams that have preyed on Harry Potter fans, following this scam's directions will redirect victims to a malicious survey that, once filled out, requests their phone number.

Related story: Secrets of 'Breaking Dawn': What do we know?

"As past scams have demonstrated, giving one's phone number during one of these scams is a very bad idea and could result [in] the user being subscribed to premium-rate services," the tech blog Softpedia wrote.

If you come across this, or any other suspicious-looking Facebook offers, ignore them, and never download any attachments, as they often harbor malicious software. For a list of social networking alternatives, click here.

© 2012 SecurityNewsDaily. All rights reserved

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